Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘travel’

So are you sick of these yet? Well..don’t read them then!

A reminder of why I do this daily update thing, and will for a while: Dissatisfaction with education grows and grows. More folks who once may have said, “I could never…” are contemplating the possibility of homeschooling. There are loads of different ways to do it – here’s ours. No boxed curriculum, no online classes, a touch of unschooling (not as much as I had hoped, I admit), a few texts, a lot of ad hoc. And every great while, the teacher is a little hungover from book group. So.

  • Prayer: We missed the daily readings yesterday because we had to dash out of the house for the Cathedral class, so I caught him up on David today – told him about Absalom, read about the death of Absalom, and then the death of David.
  • Today’s first reading was Ecclesiasticus (Sirach) which was a summary of David’s life, accomplishments and character.  We read it – I read half, he read half – and then after we read the Gospel (death of J the B) and prayed, I swung back around to the structure of the Old Testament – had him recite the books he knows in order (now through 2 Chronicles), then I explained the different types of books: Torah/Pentateuch, historical, Wisdom, Prophets, and in particular the nature of Wisdom books.
  • Usually Friday is illustrate-one-of-your-copywork-entries day. He didn’t feel like drawing, so we just hit the dictation (see Wednesday for explanation).
  • Oh, then we looked at a February calendar and talked about the month’s big days: Chinese New Year, Mardi Gras, Ash Wednesday, Lincoln’s birthday, Washington’s birthday, Presidents Day or whatever it is.
  • 2 word problems for Math revew.
  • Beast Academy  – defining coefficient and variable, combining like terms. A couple of pages of “corralling like terms” puzzles and then simplification with problems like these. 
  • Page of Latin review, which involved once again going over various sentence structures: Subject-Predicate nominative; subject-predicate adjective; subject – direct object. And some vocab and imperfect of sum. 
  • Writing and Rhetoric – summarizing a story – an exercise which builds on the careful method of learning how to summarize that this curriculum teaches. Since it’s a workbook, it involves crossing out inessentials, circling important details and main points, and so on. Very helpful.
  • Look at the material on insects in the Animal book –  keep recommending it to you, and I mean it. If you have a child interested in zoology, this is the book to get. It is chock full of great photos, but more than that is actually a comprehensive presentation of animal life organized according to phyla, with loads of solid information – not just cute pictures.
  • Grasshopper time.  Time to dissect the grasshopper specimen I had purchased from Carolina. It’s big. He studied this worksheet as well as the instructions included with the kit, and went to work.  First examine the exterior of the bug, identify parts – then cut off legs and wings, cut through the exoskeleton to get to the innards. I had watched a couple of videos to prep. 
  • "amy welborn"
  • Next week: crayfish.
  • Story today was “The Lady or the Tiger?” He read it, and then looked over some study questions to prepare for talking about it. His opinion was that the tiger was behind the opened door. The focus of the discussion was on what either possibility would say about the princess, as well as the power of an ambiguous ending. He admitted that he was frustrated by the ending, but on the other hand, if the story did have definite closure – if we did know which door the poor man opened – it wouldn’t be a story anyone would really care about.  It would be just about the princess and what we learn about her through that revelation in a way that puts a lid on further contemplation, rather than encouraging it.
  • (Does none of that make a lick of sense? Well read the story!)
  • So the focus of lit discussions this week has been irony and the impact of a story’s ending. It’s been interesting.
  • And that’s it. Brother had a slightly earlier day and had to be fetched. Piano practice after that, then a couple of hours outside with the neighbor friend.
  • Timeframe 10am-1.

Read Full Post »

  • ANOTHER short day!  Well, we will try to cram as much as we can in…
  • The reason it’s shorter is because it’s the feast of St. Blaise, and we want to go to Mass at the Cathedral at noon.  That doesn’t mean we absolutely can’t accomplish anything this afternoon, but the chances of getting out of Mass, shrugging and saying “Eh, let’s just call it a day” are pretty high. So..
  • Prayer was just a Hail Mary and some intentions – safe travels for a family member, healing of various ailments, comfort and healing for all the sick, especially children.
  • (No readings because we would be going to Mass)
  • Mixing up the usual order of things, I had him read today’s short story first because I was going to take the copywork/dictation from it and didn’t want to spoil it.  “The Lumber Room” by Saki – a great story. Pair Nicholas with Shirley Jackson’s “Charles” and you’ve got a couple of kids who could easily rule the world. Discussion of the story centered on irony (the punished kid has the Best Day Ever and the rewarded kids have a miserable time) and what the story says about children having to maneuvering to nourish their imaginations in face of the restrictions that adults are constantly putting on them.
  • Copywork /dictation:The dramatic part of the incident was that there really was a frog in Nicholas’s basin of bread-and-milk; he had put it there himself, so he felt entitled to know something about it. 
  • Remember what dictation is: He copies the sentence one day, and then the next, I dictate it to him and he writes it correctly. This one has an interesting spelling word (incident) and just a bit punctuation to note: the use of the semi-colon and the commas.
  • Come to think of it, let’s go ahead and read “Charles.”  The conversation was on the humor in the story, but also on the way it ends.  Why, I asked, would Jackson not end with an explanatory sentence like, “Now I understand what Laurie had been up to all this time…”  We talked about why an abrupt ending was more powerful and fitting – it condenses the darkish irony of the story into a single sharp sentence uttered by an oblivious observer. I mean, he didn’t say that, but he knew, instinctively, that too much explanation ruins things.
  • In the process of digging up stories, I discovered that the Library of America has a fantastic “Story of the Week” site. 
  • Cursive. One sentence from the work book.
  • Math practice – more word problems from the Evan-Moor book.
  • Beast Academy: Practicing order of operations with these pages. 
  • Looks hairy, but it’s not. Just keep in mind that problem-solving mindset: break it apart and apply the rules – and it’s fine.
  • A bit of paragraph unity work from Reasoning and Reading:  crossing out sentences that don’t fit, and then adding a sentence to an incomplete paragraph. There were three exercises in the latter, and I just had him pick one of them to finish.
  • Writing and Rhetoric – just a bit on run-on sentences – which is the bane of my writing-with-kids existence.  I swear. I ultimately resorted to “Long sentences are your enemy.”  Keep them short and they might be boring, but at least they probably won’t be run-ons.
  • Back to invertebrates for a bit.  He recited the names of the 6 invertebrate phyla, spelled each correctly, gave an example and major characteristics – using this chart.
  • Then we went through the intro to arthropods (since we did worms last week) in the great Animal book and read about that…will go into more detail on insects tomorrow and  try to dissect a grasshopper on Friday, then crayfish next week.
  • With just a bit of time left, we looked at the Classics for Kids site – a great music site. We’ve listened to many of the composer broadcasts, but today we looked at musical definitions and instruments and listened to examples.  Talking about how the first violinist tunes the rest of the orchestra led us to talk about Beethoven’s 9th – in which the opening of the first movement echoes that exercise – then to listen to a bit of it, which then, as these things do, led us, for the second day in a row, to Mr. Bean.

 

  • Off to Mass!
  • Timeframe 9:45-11:50.  2 hours.
  • (and for the record – after Mass: lunch; get rat for snake; go home feed snake, discuss snake, clean snake habitat, practice piano during which the idea for a composition evoking battle of snake v. rat was floated and demonstrated – not by me, just to make that clear.)

Read Full Post »

…& Shakespeare with Kids

Those of you who follow my daily homeschool updates know that we’ve been working our way up to a performance of As You Like It. 

Well, the performance was last night, so I’ll recap our prep and the performance.

First, this isn’t our first Shakespeare rodeo. One of the reasons I started homeschooling was that I was sick and tired of the stupid, dumbed-down literature curricula in all schools. Wasting time answering questions about stories written to reflect current fashionable concerns about diversity and self-acceptance…can we be exposed to some realness instead? Realness being an exploration of the tension, darkness, possibility and hope of the human condition, recognized as wise and illuminating by the human community, treasured and handed down to us via the cumulative wisdom of human tradition.

Over the past three and a half years, we have “studied” (in our own light way) and seen performances of Macbeth (two), The Taming of the Shrew, Twelfth Night, A Midsummer’s Night Dream, Julius Caesar (our first) and now, As You Like It. 

(Reference – boys are now 11 & 14 years old)

Five of the performances have been at the Atlanta Shakespeare Tavern, one (Shrew) at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival (which seems to be presenting less and less actual Shakespeare as time goes on…)  and one (the second Macbeth) at Samford University. 

My older son is now in school (9th grade), but because he is resigned to my fascist ways  he has become accustomed to my “teachable moments” mode of parenting, only made more intolerable   honed even sharper by homeschooling, he doesn’t blink an eye when told that in the evenings, we’ll be spending a bit of time going over and talking about some Shakespeare.

(Specific resources? The Folger Library. There are loads of other resources online. I don’t have a specific go-to source every time. I do find that searching for “Play name” and “study guide” gets you to some great resources offered by various theaters around the country – most of them tend to produce study guides directed at educators and families for every Shakespeare production they are offering.)

(Also – there are many reasons to be tempted to move to the San Diego area, but the fantastic Shakespeare Academy regularly threatens to put me over the edge.)

So in tackling a play, we begin by going over a synopsis – perhaps in a picture book or one of the collections. Then we start reading through the play – not all of it, but simply parts that are the most vital/well-known or that I think will be most engaging to them. We all take our turns reading. Some enjoy that more than others.

We also might do some memorization – although when both of them were homeschooling, we were more dedicated to that than we are now, unfortunately. If you are at all interested in delving into Shakespeare with your children, Ken Ludwig’s How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare is invaluable. 

Then, interspersed with all of that, we watch – if we are going to see a performance, we don’t generally watch an entire film, with two exceptions: We watched the Brando Julius Caesar and the Taylor/Burton Taming of the Shrew.  We watched a lot of the Patrick Steward Macbeth, which I really like, but honestly the way the three sisters are portrayed is so creepy, at the time (two years ago, I guess), I fast-forwarded through those parts since I felt they were too intense.

And then we do a lot of scene comparison – watching different ways in which the three sisters have been played in film, different version of Julius Caesar  – the RSC production set in Africa was spectacular and illuminating, for example.

The BBC animated Shakespeare tales provide an engaging summary as well. 

As I have said before, we’re not about plot analysis or making charts about protagonists or antagonists. We want the story, the language and the big ideas and small moments, and to connect with these characters because their stories are about living in this world, and we want to grow in wisdom.

All of us.

So with As You Like It.  It’s not a complex play – once you get the family relations sorted out – so we didn’t take weeks and weeks to prepare. We began last Sunday – I sketched out (literally) the family relations, ran through a quick synopsis, and then we read chunks of the first act. On subsequent evenings, we read chunks of the second and third acts, watched the BBC animated version, and I called it done.  They understood it all well enough to be able to enjoy those last two acts without study, so that was it.

The Atlanta Shakespeare Tavern provides a great time. I guess you would call it dinner theater, but we’ll call it an Elizabethan theater tavern instead. Evening shows begin at 7:30, seating opens a bit more than an hour before. Food and drinks are served until about ten minutes before the show begins (kitchen reopens at intermission with desserts). The food is okay, although not very my-kid-friendly. Last night we made do with chili – with extra chips – and the bread basket.

It’s a great, casual atmosphere. Tables on the floor level, as ell as a balcony.  Volunteers help with the dining area and tickets, but so do members of the company, so the guy you remember playing Cassius that one time might be clearing your table.

It’s an ideal venue for introducing children to Shakespeare performances. The audience tends to be very diverse – as Atlanta is as a city – and when there are comedies performed, there are usually a good number of children, so they can see that this is not just a grown-up-school- thing. This is a people thing.

I’m going to say that I think this performance of As You Like It was one of the best we’ve seen there. There were some new faces to us – the actor who did double duty as the wrestler Charles and Duke Senior was a particular favorite, as was Touchstone. Shenanigans and schtick happens, but you know what…it’s a COMEDY.

Some notes:

Playing Rosalind is like fulfilling a million different childhood dreams at once. At different points in the play, I get to channel a Disney princess, Hermione Granger, Carol Burnett, and even Ron Swanson from Parks & Recreation. But I also get to channel Dani, which didn’t used to feel like a dream at all. As Rosalind, I get to be weird and tall and loud and passionate, and I still get to kiss the kind, beautiful guy at the end. And if the audience is laughing at me, it probably means that I did something funny.

 

 

It was a busy day: They served retreat Mass at the convent at noon, then we jumped in the car and went straight to Atlanta…to Mass. (I knew everyone would be tired on Sunday, so I wanted to let them sleep in the morning. ) It’s a good education in understanding the differences between daily & Sunday Mass as well as the nature and reason for the Sunday (even in vigil) obligation.  We went to the Cathedral at 5 – the Irish pastor of which has that practice of opening a homily with an “amusing” story that has nothing whatsoever to do with the Scriptures, the season…anything. It is so weird. It doesn’t serve to bring us in, as I’m sure is intended, but is instead a distraction from Mass. Sorry.

The other weird thing – and please understand this is an enormous parish (5500 families) with a tiny church  – yes it is the Cathedral, but it was built in the 30’s when there weren’t that many Catholics in Atlanta – that only holds 700.  They have to do what they can do – and at 5, that means they have settled on having an English language Mass in the church and then a Spanish Mass across the hall in a multipurpose room. The English language Mass was no more than half full – the Spanish congregation looked packed out. Interesting.

So…Mass, drive, Mass, As You Like It, drive 2 hours back.

shakespeare tavern atlanta

Taken before the performance during the announcements. Phone was off during the show. I promise.

 

 

Read Full Post »

Please check out this fantastic video on St. Bernard’s Abbey, just up the road in Cullman. Unfortunately “just up” is not quite close enough for us to use the school. But honestly, watch it and share, please. It offers a lovely summation of monasticism and Christian discipleship.

The Benedictine Monks of St. Bernard Abbey from Electric Peak Creative on Vimeo.

Read Full Post »

A reminder of why I do this. More and more people are interested in homeschooling. More and more people are questioning the assumptions that professional educators are shoving at them regarding pedagogy and outcomes. More and more people who are pouring tuition into Catholic schools that are mindlessly following these trends are questioning as well. I’m putting this out there just so it will be floating around the web as a peak inside a sort of typical homeschool day. It’s not typical because I’m only homeschooling one, and perhaps not super typical because we don’t do any sort of boxed curriculum or online classes. 

Also – I usually do this the day of when all the rabbit trails are fresh in my mind. This is 24 hours later now, and I’m old, so…bare bones.

  • Friday! Made all the more complicated because of the Threat of Snow. It wasn’t supposed to come through until later in the day, but chances were high that the high school would dismiss early, so we had to take that into account.
  • (And it did – 1pm. )
  • Prayer – keeping up on 1 Samuel. We had missed Thursday because of the Cathedral class, so we read that, Friday’s, and Saturday’s, and filled in the blanks. Covered Saul’s pursuit of David and his death. Even though it is roundly derided by many, I always had a soft spot for Richard Gere’s King David and might dig it up for viewing this weekend – nude Bathsheba fast-forwarded through. It’s not a terrible movie and it follows 1-2 Samuel fairly faithfully.
  • So, yes, prayer, as per usual with the Morning Prayer petitions of the day.
  • No copywork – Friday he illustrates one of his previous copywork entries. He chose the “Blow, blow thou winter wind” from a few days ago. 
  • Keeping up with cursive – just one sentence from this book.  (For cursive practice, he uses leftover books from my older son’s time in 4th and 5th grade brick-and-mortar school. They are specifically for Catholic schools, so they have a lot of Catholic vocabulary and Catholic-oriented sentences.  I can still use them because the “method” of teaching cursive in those classes was to hand out the books at the beginning of the year and say, “Hey, you guys need to get this done when you can.” Therefore, we have a couple of mostly blank cursive workbooks.
  • #Tuition
  • Math was multiplication and division review and word problems.  We’ll start a new unit of Beast Academy on Monday.
  • He then finished reading the Revolutionary War chapter  in From Sea to Shining Sea and did the workbook pages.  We’re finished with the Revolutionary War and will start the Constitution next week.
  • He went off and finished reading the last 30 pages of Johnny Tremain and looked over the questions in this study guide. Monday he’ll do some writing related to it.
  • Practiced piano.
  • Done. Not super creative. Not even time for any videos that I’d bookmarked. I had intended to do the worm dissection in the afternoon after his brother got home, but by that time his neighborhood friend was also home from school (all the schools dismissed early..it’s what we  do down here with “possible inclement weather”) so the three of them spent the rest of the afternoon outside, which was better anyway.
  • Timeframe: 10-12:30.

Read Full Post »

  • Another late start. We haven’t gotten started before 9:30 any day this week. In one sense, it’s fine, but even thirty minutes earlier is better. Next week, maybe.
  • Prayer – the 1 Samuel readings skip all the way to chapter 8, so first order of business was to summarize what happens between 4-8 and then read chapter 8 – from the Bible, w/a quick review/recitation of the books of the OT up to 1 Kings, have him look up the passage in the actual Bible, and so on.
  • Gospel/pray a Hail Mary.  Not super intense.
  • No copywork. Instead, dictation first: the passage from Johnny Tremain that was copywork on Tuesday. I dictated, he wrote it correctly.  We also talked about the last sentence of the passage, which is the last  of a section   : Swimming, he could forget it. 
  • The “it” was his injured hand. We talked about how this construction was different  – and stronger from say, “While he was swimming, he could forget it” or “He could forget about his hand while he was swimming.”  Especially as the final sentence of a chapter or section.
  •  I tell you, this homeschool thing is a much for me as for others.
  • Then, as per usual, Friday is also “illustrate any of your past copywork” day. He chose an African proverb from back in November: “However long the night, the dawn will break.” Simple scene with a nice-looking savannah.
  • Math was yet another sheaf of Beast Academy puzzles.  This time involving finding “blobs” of factors in a grid whose product is the same target – say -660 or 525. It involves keeping your signs straight and, if you want to make it easier on yourself, prime factorization.
  • This was done on the couch, looking out at the bird feeder. The number of doves was commented on – so we looked up mourning doves at the Cornell site, read about them, listened to their call, and so on. We had a couple all last summer and early fall, but there were…a lot this morning. Migrants, we concluded. We welcome them!
  • Someone wondered what a group of geese was called. He knew it was something odd. A Gaggle.
  • He’s fascinated by the movement of birds’ heads.
  • Speaking of the Cornell site – this is nifty – an interactive bird anatomy activity. 
  • Saw red-winged blackbirds, which were new. Having a birdfeeder (or birdbath) is one of the best nature-education things you can have at home. You can just sit and look outside and talk and – boom – education.
  • Next, writing with Writing and Rhetoric. The assignment was on pages 14-16 of the book, found here –  amplification of a story about John Henry. First, to add dialogue, and then to add descriptive details.  That is being done in his room, with his keyboard on automatic, playing as accompaniment.
  • Then he did a quick Latin review on his own.
  • Timeframe, not including the museum: 10-12:30.

This afternoon after lunch, we went to the excellent Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. It’s my fourth time, but his first in a couple of years – and it’s a big difference seeing it when you are barely nine than when you are eleven.

We had prepared by reading the “I Have a Dream” speech, pulling out the themes King drew from the Declaration and the Constitution and then I did a bit of explanation of the history between the establishment of the US and the 1950’s Civil Rights movement – it was covered at the museum, but I wanted to emphasize it.

The museum does treat Civil Rights history in general, but given its location – across the street from the 16th Street Baptist Church and from Kelly Ingram Park, where the bulk of the confrontation between Bull Connor’s forces and the protesting young people took place, and given King’s activity here and nearby, it has a legitimate Birmingham focus. The pre-1954 material gives an excellent overview of segregated life in Birmingham, then with Brown, the way is paved for more in-depth politics and protest. Today, we spent the most time with the Freedom Riders exhibit, the Letter from a Birmingham Jail section, the display and videos on the youth protests, a good video overview of the issue of voting rights from post-Civil War to the Voting Rights Act, and the heartbreaking exhibit on the church bombings, which includes a case, you might say, of relics – a pair of one of the girl’s shoes, a cross worn around one of their necks, and so on.

As we left, we stopped and chatted with the woman staffing the computer room – a retired schoolteacher.  She told us more about the church bombing, including about the fifth victim  – who survived – Sarah Collins Rudolph.  It was a very interesting conversation.

"amy welborn"

 

Read Full Post »

  • Monday. Late start. Which is too bad because I wanted him to wake up before the frost melted away, so we could talk about that. Maybe tomorrow.
  • Prayer: Reading of the day.  I introduced them by reminding him that now that it is Ordinary Time – for the next few weeks at least – the Mass readings will be focused on Jesus’ public ministry. The first readings for daily Mass are beginning with 1 Samuel. So first we read the Gospel and prayed the petitions for Morning Prayer, Lord’s Prayer, etc.
  • Then after prayer proper we talked about the Old Testament.  Reviewed the basic historical content up to Samuel, drilled a bit on listing the books up to 2 Kings. Talked about Pentateuch/Torah, about the scrolls in a synagogue. Then read the passage for the day (1 Sam 1:1-8) with a map open, talking about Shiloh, about how Jerusalem would not be a part of the story until David, etc. Also pivoted back and drilled on the names of the first four apostles.
  • 1 Samuel is my favorite book of the Bible, so even better.
  • When I say “drill” I don’t mean with a pointer in hand, barking out names. I mean just learning by going over it a few times. There.
  • Copywork was Mark 1:16-17 in cursive.
  • Math: workbook pages on multiplication of negative and positive integers in Beast Academy. Four pages of puzzles basically – it’s one of the things I love about BA – puzzles are an integral part of the learning and reinforcement. Like this one. 
  • "amy welborn"
  • It can be frustrating. The puzzles get more difficult pretty quickly, but they are so cannily written that working through them results in clearly superior understanding.
  • History next, but a bit of a break from the politics. We dabbled a bit in art, music and literature of the Revolutionary period. Basically culled from what I pulled together while he was doing his math.  So yes, intense prep.
  • First, music – watched a bit of this video, focusing on “Yankee Doodle.”  It started interrupting and hesitating, so after Yankee Doodle was done, I declared it finished.
  • Then art – this video on Copley, part of a YouTube channel that I think is just great.  Probably do a bit more on this tomorrow.
  • Then Phillis Wheatly – quickly read/summarized some biographical material, snippets from a couple of poems, an account of her meeting with George Washington, and briefly discussed why she falls out of favor with some contemporary critics.
  • At some point, this was interrupted by the request to learn how to do a coin roll over the knuckles.  A video was watched, that was attempted, as well as videos on flicking cards and the “waterfall.”
  • Latin – workbook pages in chapter 19. 
  • We have been doing the Writing and Rhetoric series from Classical Academic Press, and I’ve liked it very much. Because it takes a particular angle, I thought it best to start below grade level to get used to the routine – so we did books 1 & 2 (grades 3-4. He’s 5th) last year . It started to get a little tiresome, so I peaked ahead at the grade 5 material – it’s fine, and not an unreasonable jump at all. So that arrived last week and we started today: Refutation and Confirmation.  He read the introductory material (defining the terms, using the legend of John Henry and Peter Pan as examples) and then we discussed it.  It fit in nicely with a discussion we had sometime last week about suspension of disbelief and how that works in the dramatic arts – and on what basis we can get immersed in a story about a talking pig, rat and a spider who knows how to write and read and then, at some point, come to a point in a story we can’t buy. (Not that I have one in Charlotte’s Web. It’s just something that fascinates me – how can I be watching an animated feature in which literally anything could be made to happen, and then mentally check out when something “unrealistic” happens.
  • So just reading and talking about that today. Writing tomorrow. Back to Johnny Tremain, as well.
  • Then some art – this came through my emailbox today, so we went for it. Chalk pastels are not his favorite, and I absolutely sympathize.  I don’t like the feel of chalk against paper – as is the case with say, dry paper towels rubbing against each other – it’s something I weirdly can’t even think about without a shiver. WHY????  
  • But he put that all aside and had fun, first experimenting and testing, then getting to the actual project. Simple, but good.

"amy welborn"

  • Oh, I was going to be all “let’s be cultural” during lunch, so I started playing audio of The Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, and after 73 seconds he just looked at me in total confusion. Yeah, he had never read it, and the beginning is hard to follow, especially if you’re only listening.
  • So we watched the Lego version. 
  • Timeframe, including prayer and lunch: 10-2.

Dissection stuff arrived over the weekend. Haven’t opened the box or told anyone it’s here yet. Give me a minute.

Reminder why I’m doing this – first as a record for myself.  Secondly, just to have it out there for anyone pondering homeschooling. This is one way to do it. 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: