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Posts Tagged ‘Rome’

Well, definitely 21st century First World problems. So I’ll deal.

Although I will say it has made planning the next week far more challenging that it might have been. Or has it? Perhaps it has just shortened it and nipped my ‘satiable curiosity about the Next Best Vacation Rental in the bud, that curiosity that makes it so difficult to make a decision sometimes.

So this time, it’s more, “That one has beds and wi-fi. Looks good.Grab it before the internet collapses.”

So we are set…until Monday. The next rental promises good internet, so we will see.

At this point, we are catching a train to Orvieto tomorrow, seeing Orvieto, then picking up a rental car and heading west.

For some reason, I couldn’t get enthusiastic about picking up a rental car in Rome. I’m a little nervous about driving, although I have driven in Europe before, including Sicily and including Palermo. I’ve driven in Manhattan and Chicago and ATLANTA.  And even though I wouldn’t have been driving much in actual Rome – and could have avoided it completely by getting a car at the airport, I just wasn’t feeling it. For one, getting the car at the airport would have been a hassle: Train ride to FCO, then get car. I might as well just take the train somewhere else and avoid that specific stress. The train stations have rental car offices nearby, but really…if I’m taking us to the train station…why not just get on the train and go somewhere and take care of a car later?
So we’ll see. I will take a few minutes tonight to review my Italian road signs. This won’t be as bad as that time at the beginning of the Fall 2012-3-months-in-Europe-thing that as we descended into Paris it dawned on me that I had not even begun to familiarize myself with French road rules and signs, and I would be picking up a car right aftet we landed and setting off in it. In France.

So again with the sketchy internet. Just a brief review of today, then: Over to St. Peter’s by 9, headed straight to the dome, which I’d never before. 5 minutes in security, no line at the dome ticket office. Took the elevator partway up, walked the rest, saw the sights. Back down into the Basilica, where I was struck by the large areas that are now roped off from visitors. There is a the big path down the middle reserved for Year of Mercy pilgrims (who are visitors of course) and then the whole area from way in front of the baldacchino all the way back, and then the whole area around Alexander VII’s tomb. It makes the rest of the space even more crowded than ever.

Then…rain. We sought shelter in souvenir shops and an overpriced lunch, then made it back to the apartment to wait out the weather, which eventually cleared.

So..hop on the 75 bus to Circo Massimo, change to the 118, and down to the Appian Way. We toured the Catecombs of St. Callistus and St. Sebastian, and then walked a big chunk of the road. Back on the 118 and 75, rest for a bit in the apartment, start to clean and pack, then out for an excellent, reasonable dinner here. 2 appetizers, 2 pastas, 2 secondi (scallopini) (all split between the 3 of us), 2 cokes, 1 large mineral water, a small carafe of wine – 64 E. Not bad at all.

I hope with dependable internet and quieter nights, I’ll have more time to share notes from the past couple of days…

 

 

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I really liked this sign.

I also liked this booklet idea, found in one of the Vatican bookshops. It’s for an older elementary child, with the story of the saint he or she might be named after. My name is….

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Finally, on the Appian Way.  I’ll write more about it later, but just say, we enjoyed the St. Callisto tour more, as it was led by a lively older British Salesian, and also just say that it would be pretty amazing to live in an place where your afternoon park stroll could be down a 2,000 year old Roman road.

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I think the deal with the internet is that there is a daily quota, and since the minute we hit the apartment, finish dinner and have rest time, two of our party start watching videos on their devices…that’s eating it up. So I have put a ban on the video-watching (hmmmm) for the moment because I *really* need internet in order to plan the last section of the trip WHICH STARTS ON FRIDAY AND FOR WHICH I HAVE PLANNED NOT A THING. I mean…no accommodations, no car rental…..This is getting kind of insane. Kind of?
If you see a woman, a teen-aged boy and pre-teen boy dragging suitcases along Tuscan roads….it’s us. Wave as you speed by on your Vespa.
The point is, I am even loathe to try to upload photographs until I get that done. So for today know that…
Wednesday, we spent the day at Ostia Antica. It was great. We’ve been to Pompeii, and both are equally fascinating in different ways.   This morning (It’s about 3pm as I write this), we had a guided tour of the Colosseum and Forum, walked up the Palatine, took the 8 tram back in the direction of our apartment, hopped off at a random Trastevere stop, grabbed pizza at the first place we saw…pizza which was fantastic..ate it walking back to the tram, got back to the apartment, are resting for a bit until we go back out and hit the centro for real this time.

So, nervously, I will share just a few photos…

More later after I figure next week out…if I have internet left…

But Instagram (amy_welborn) and Snapchat (amywelborn2) work with data, so….

 

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We’ll start with the more confusing one – James. As is the case with (in English) “Mary” – there are a lot of “James” in the New Testament narratives, so sorting them out is a challenge. And perhaps not even really possible.

Today’s feast celebrates James “the Lesser” – as opposed to James the Greater, brother of John, one of the first four apostles called by Jesus, present at the Transfiguration, feast June 25, etc.

This James, son of Alphaeus, is often identified with the James who was head of the Church in Jerusalem and the author of the New Testament letter.  That’s what Pope Benedict went with in his 2007 General Audience talk: 

Thus, St James’ Letter shows us a very concrete and practical Christianity. Faith must be fulfilled in life, above all, in love of neighbour and especially in dedication to the poor. It is against this background that the famous sentence must be read: “As the body apart from the spirit is dead, so faith apart from works is dead” (Jas 2: 26).

At times, this declaration by St James has been considered as opposed to the affirmations of Paul, who claims that we are justified by God not by virtue of our actions but through our faith "amy welborn"(cf. Gal 2: 16; Rom 3: 28). However, if the two apparently contradictory sentences with their different perspectives are correctly interpreted, they actually complete each other.

St Paul is opposed to the pride of man who thinks he does not need the love of God that precedes us; he is opposed to the pride of self-justification without grace, simply given and undeserved.

St James, instead, talks about works as the normal fruit of faith: “Every sound tree bears good fruit, but the bad tree bears evil fruit”, the Lord says (Mt 7: 17). And St James repeats it and says it to us.

Lastly, the Letter of James urges us to abandon ourselves in the hands of God in all that we do: “If the Lord wills” (Jas 4: 15). Thus, he teaches us not to presume to plan our lives autonomously and with self interest, but to make room for the inscrutable will of God, who knows what is truly good for us.

Now, Philip. I think this GA talk really highlight’s B16’s catechetical skills. We don’t know that much about Philip, but Benedict takes what we do know, and hones it down in the most practical…pastoral way:

The Fourth Gospel recounts that after being called by Jesus, Philip meets Nathanael and tells him: “We have found him of whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph” (Jn 1: 45). Philip does not give way to Nathanael’s somewhat sceptical answer (“Can anything good come out of Nazareth?”) and firmly retorts: “Come and see!” (Jn 1: 46).

In his dry but clear response, Philip displays the characteristics of a true witness: he is not satisfied with presenting the proclamation theoretically, but directly challenges the person addressing him by suggesting he have a personal experience of what he has been told.

The same two verbs are used by Jesus when two disciples of John the Baptist approach him to ask him where he is staying. Jesus answers: “Come and see” (cf. Jn 1: 38-39).

We can imagine that Philip is also addressing us with those two verbs that imply personal involvement. He is also saying to us what he said to Nathanael: “Come and see”. The Apostle engages us to become closely acquainted with Jesus.

In fact, friendship, true knowledge of the other person, needs closeness and indeed, to a certain extent, lives on it. Moreover, it should not be forgotten that according to what Mark writes, Jesus chose the Twelve primarily “to be with him” (Mk 3: 14); that is, to share in his life and learn directly from him not only the style of his behaviour, but above all who he really was.

Indeed, only in this way, taking part in his life, could they get to know him and subsequently, proclaim him."amy welborn"

Later, in Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians, one would read that what is important is to “learn Christ” (4: 20): therefore, not only and not so much to listen to his teachings and words as rather to know him in person, that is, his humanity and his divinity, his mystery and his beauty. In fact, he is not only a Teacher but a Friend, indeed, a Brother.

How will we be able to get to know him properly by being distant? Closeness, familiarity and habit make us discover the true identity of Jesus Christ. The Apostle Philip reminds us precisely of this. And thus he invites us to “come” and “see”, that is, to enter into contact by listening, responding and communion of life with Jesus, day by day.

Then, on the occasion of the multiplication of the loaves, he received a request from Jesus as precise as it was surprising: that is, where could they buy bread to satisfy the hunger of all the people who were following him (cf. Jn 6: 5). Then Philip very realistically answered: “Two hundred denarii would not buy enough bread for each of them to get a little” (Jn 6: 7).

Here one can see the practicality and realism of the Apostle who can judge the effective implications of a situation.

We then know how things went. We know that Jesus took the loaves and after giving thanks, distributed them. Thus, he brought about the multiplication of the loaves.

It is interesting, however, that it was to Philip himself that Jesus turned for some preliminary help with solving the problem: this is an obvious sign that he belonged to the close group that surrounded Jesus.

On another occasion very important for future history, before the Passion some Greeks who had gone to Jerusalem for the Passover “came to Philip… and said to him, “Sir, we wish to see Jesus’. Philip went and told Andrew; Andrew went with Philip and they told Jesus” (cf. Jn 12: 20-22).

Once again, we have an indication of his special prestige within the Apostolic College. In this case, Philip acts above all as an intermediary between the request of some Greeks – he probably spoke Greek and could serve as an interpreter – and Jesus; even if he joined Andrew, the other Apostle with a Greek name, he was in any case the one whom the foreigners addressed.

This teaches us always to be ready to accept questions and requests, wherever they come from, and to direct them to the Lord, the only one who can fully satisfy them. Indeed, it is important to know that the prayers of those who approach us are not ultimately addressed to us, but to the Lord: it is to him that we must direct anyone in need. So it is that each one of us must be an open road towards him!

There is then another very particular occasion when Philip makes his entrance. During the Last Supper, after Jesus affirmed that to know him was also to know the Father (cf. Jn 14: 7), Philip quite ingenuously asks him: “Lord, show us the Father, and we shall be satisfied” (Jn 14: 8). Jesus answered with a gentle rebuke: “Have I been with you so long, and yet you do not know me, Philip? He who has seen me has seen the Father: how can you say, “Show us the Father?’ Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father in me?… Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father in me” (Jn 14: 9-11).

These words are among the most exalted in John’s Gospel. They contain a true and proper revelation. At the end of the Prologue to his Gospel, John says: “No one has ever seen God; the only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has made him known” (Jn 1: 18).

Well, that declaration which is made by the Evangelist is taken up and confirmed by Jesus himself, but with a fresh nuance. In fact, whereas John’s Prologue speaks of an explanatory intervention by Jesus through the words of his teaching, in his answer to Philip Jesus refers to his own Person as such, letting it be understood that it is possible to understand him not only through his words but rather, simply through what he is.

To express ourselves in accordance with the paradox of the Incarnation we can certainly say that God gave himself a human face, the Face of Jesus, and consequently, from now on, if we truly want to know the Face of God, all we have to do is to contemplate the Face of Jesus! In his Face we truly see who God is and what he looks like!

The Evangelist does not tell us whether Philip grasped the full meaning of Jesus’ sentence. There is no doubt that he dedicated his whole life entirely to him. According to certain later accounts (Acts of Philip and others), our Apostle is said to have evangelized first Greece and then Frisia, where he is supposed to have died, in Hierapolis, by a torture described variously as crucifixion or stoning.

Let us conclude our reflection by recalling the aim to which our whole life must aspire: to encounter Jesus as Philip encountered him, seeking to perceive in him God himself, the heavenly Father. If this commitment were lacking, we would be reflected back to ourselves as in a mirror and become more and more lonely! Philip teaches us instead to let ourselves be won over by Jesus, to be with him and also to invite others to share in this indispensable company; and in seeing, finding God, to find true life.

 

Many years ago, I wrote a study guide for B16’s collected General Audience talks on the Apostles and other early Church figures. The study guide is available online in pdf form – so if you have a church discussion group and would like to use it, or even just for yourself  – there it is. 

Both images from St. John Lateran in Rome. 

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Ah…Rome.

I had not initially planned to include Rome in this trip, since we were there 3 ½ years ago. But then I thought, well, 3 ½ years is a long time in Child Time, I, personally could go to Rome once a year and be fine with it, and finally, I started thinking about the things we haven’t done in Rome yet…and then I saw that it’s only a 2-hour, 20 Euro train ride from Bologna, and so Rome was back in the running.

This will not be a lengthy, word, thinking-out-loud post like the others, because the parameters of this step were pretty clear to me – doing the two major things we haven’t done in the Roma area: The Appian Way and the catacombs in that area, and then Ostia Antica.

Ostia Antica is, of course, not in Rome, but rather a short train ride to the coast. It’s a fine site of the ancient Roman port – sort of like a smaller Pompeii, without the volcano. My late father went there during his month in Rome several years ago, and enjoyed it very much. We have been to Pompeii, but we are always up for ruins, so Ostia Antica it is.

I would like to try to get into one of the new underground tours of the Coliseum, but they are really popular and I don’t know if it will be possible. We also have never been to the Capitoline Museum – somehow, when in Rome, indoor museums are never a priority with me. There’s so much to see just walking around outside. We will try to do that, but a priority will be, I think, a guided tour of the Palatine Hill and Forum. We walk through the Forum every time we go, trying to be intelligent about it, but I think a tour guide would really deepen our appreciation..especially since kids tend to listen to a tour guide with far more attentiveness than they do to Mom. Who barely knows what she’s talking about so yeah. Tour. And I do think that will be a more interesting excursion than the museum, if we have to choose.

Other than that…wandering, revisiting St. Peter’s and as many other past favorite sites as we can.

In the past, we have stayed in apartments off the Borgo Vittorio, near the Vatican. I can’t find the first one in which we stayed over ten years ago, but this is the place we stayed at in 2012. I grabbed a larger, 3-bedroom apartment because we had a friend from the US staying with us for a few days during our time there. (And if you look at the cost of the apartment, you will see what I mean about relative pricing. People, I paid more than that per night for a mediocre hotel room in Charleston – the cheapest I could find –  a few weeks ago.Bah.)  In 2008, one of my older sons was living in Rome – he worked as an English teacher there for about a year and a half – and I went to visit him at Thanksgiving. During that visit, I stayed in an apartment in the Monteverde area, west of the Tiber River and Trestavere, south of Vatican City. I’d like to show you that one, but the website is down, but I know they probably still rent it because my daughter lived in Europe for a year and a half (in Germany), and on her visit to Rome, a year ago, she stayed in the same apartment.

This time, I had thought about trying to stay around Piazza Navone or Campo di Fiore, but could never find something roomy enough that was affordable. I worried about noise as well. When we went to Madrid last year, we had a lovely apartment, but the noise at night was incredible. It wasn’t super crazy spring break revelry – just normal Spanish life, which doesn’t start until 10pm at the earliest, then goes strong until 3 am or so. But still. I wondered…how do you people get anything done in life?

So we’re back to Monteverde this time. It’s closer to transportation for the Ostia Antica thing, and it’s a quieter area.

There! That was quick!

Next, I’ll share with you what we’re reading and watching for prep. For all #Italy2016 posts go here. 

 

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"amy welborn"

 

 

Phil Pullella, Reuters: Today, you spoke very eloquently about the problems of immigration. On the other side of the border, there is a very tough electoral battle. One of the candidates for the White House, Republican, Donald Trump, in an interview recently said that you are a political man and he even said that you are a pawn, an instrument of the Mexican government for migration politics. Trump said that if he’s elected, he wants to build 2,500 kilometers of wall along the border. He wants to deport 11 million illegal immigrants, separating families, etcetera. I would like to ask you, what do you think of these accusations against you and if a North American Catholic can vote for a person like this?
 
Pope Francis: Thank God he said I was a politician because Aristotle defined the human person as ‘animal politicus.’ At least I am a human person. As to whether I am a pawn, well, maybe, I don’t know. I’ll leave that up to your judgment and that of the people. And then, a person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not building bridges, is not Christian. This is not in the Gospel. As far as what you said about whether I would advise to vote or not to vote, I am not going to get involved in that. I say only that this man is not Christian if he has said things like that. We must see if he said things in that way and in this I give the benefit of the doubt.

Please note: Among the top thing in life in which I am deeply uninterested :  Donald Trump’s spiritual life and any related  protestations.

Put away the shocked face at the Pope supposedly calling another person’s faith into question. It’s true that he was not targeting Trump specifically (that “if”), and who cares anyway, but the language here is completely consistent with Pope Francis’ rhetoric. This is his love language.

It is, in fact, one of his most reliable verbal tics, and one that composes the core of almost every homily he preaches, especially at daily Mass:

  1. Read Scriptures
  2. Find, in said Scripture, a characteristic that can be held up as either a) emblematic of a Christian or b)not emblematic of a Christian
  3. Go with it.

So just today:

Pope Francis went on to make explicit mention of the lines from Matthew’s Gospel, which foretell of the Last Judgment, when God will call men to account for what they have done to the hungry, thirsty, imprisoned, strangers. “This,” said the Holy Father, “is the Christian life: mere talk leads to vanity, to that empty pretense of being Christian – but no, that way one is not a Christian at all.”: “May the Lord give us this wisdom to understand well where lies the difference between saying and doing, and teach us the way of doing and help us to go down that way, because the way of saying brings us to the place where were these teachers of the law, these clerics, who liked dressing up and acting just like if they were so many Majesties – and this is not the reality of the Gospel. May the Lord teach us this way.”

And just a few from the past:

 

 Instead, said Pope Francis, we should all know how to forgive, and forgive “forever” as Jesus invites us to do “seven times in a day” if those who have wronged us ask for it and have repented. Jesus, says Pope Francis, “exaggerates to make us understand the importance of forgiveness” because “a Christian who is not able to forgive causes scandal: he is not a Christian.”

 

And when a little vanity creeps in, when someone believes themselves to be a winner of the ‘Nobel Prize for Holiness,” then memory is also good for us: ‘But … remember where I took you from, the very least of the flock. You were behind, in the flock.’ Memory is a great grace, and when a Christian has no memory – this is a hard thing, but it’s true – he is not a Christian, he is an idolater. Because he is before a God that has no road, that does not know how to move forward on the road. Our God is moving forward on the road with us, He is among us, He walks with us. He saves us. He makes history with us. Be mindful of all that, and life becomes more fruitful, with the grace of memory.

 

God’s mercy, the Pontiff said, reaches even to those who decline the invitation or pretend to accept it but do not truly participate in the feast. Listing the excuses given by those in the parable who were too occupied to attend, Pope Francis said: “They participate in the banquet in name only, but they do not truly accept the invitation”.

“They say yes,” but they really mean no. He likened the invited guests in the Gospel to “Christians who are content to remain on the guest list”. Unfortunately, he said, “being listed as a Christian is not enough… If you do not enter into the banquet, you are not a Christian; you will be on the list, but this does not help your salvation”.

 

A person might have five theology degrees, the Holy Father said, but not have the Spirit of God. “Perhaps you will be a great theologian, but you are not a Christian, because you do not have the Spirit of God! That which gives authority, that which gives you your identity and the Holy Spirit, the anointing of the Holy Spirit.”

 

“Joy, which is like the sign of a Christian. A Christian without joy is either not a Christian or he is sick. There’s no other type! He is not doing well health-wise! A healthy Christian is a joyful Christian. I once said that there are Christians with faces like pickled peppers [sour faces – ed] … Always with these [long] faces! Some souls are also like this, this is bad! These are not Christians. A Christian without joy is not Christian. Joy is like the seal of a Christian. Even in pain, tribulations, even in persecutions”.

 

“If you can’t forgive, you are not a Christian You may be a good man, a good woman…. but you are not doing what our Lord did.  What’s more, if you can’t forgive, you cannot receive the peace of the Lord. And every day when we pray the ‘Our Father:’ Forgive us as we have forgiven those……It’s a condition. We are trying to ‘convince’ God that we’re good, that we’re good by forgiving: in reverse.  (It’s just) words, right? As that beautiful song went:   ‘Words, words, words,’ wasn’t it?  I think it was (the Italian singer) Mina who sung it. Words! Forgive one another! Just as the Lord has forgiven us, do likewise.”

 

“So it is always with God’s love,” said Francis, “that, in order to reach us, takes the way of humility.” This was the same way that Jesus walked, a way that humbled itself even unto the Cross. Pope Francis went on to say that, for a Christian, “[T]his is the golden rule,” according to which progress and advancement always come through lowering oneself. “One can take no other road,” he said, adding, “if I do not lower myself, if you do not lower yourself, you are not a Christian.”

 

The Holy Father took his cue from a Confirmation administered during the Mass. The person who receives this Sacrament, Pope Francis said, “manifested the desire to be a Christian. To be Christian means to bear witness to Jesus Christ.” A Christian is a person who “thinks like a Christian, feels like a Christian and acts like a Christian. And this is coherency in the life of a Christian. Someone can be said to have faith, “but if one of these things is missing, he is not a Christian, there’s something wrong, there’s a certain incoherence. And Christians “who ordinarily, commonly live in incoherence, do so much harm”:

 

If you read his homilies and speeches you see the same type of paradigm used over and over – a dividing, if you will, a shadow from light.

(Judgment?)

Some – many – find this type of discourse inspiring and challenging in a good way. Some find it a useful tool with which to judge others. YMMV.

What interests me about it is the role this rhetorical structure plays in his speech in general.

This might seem to be one more meandering, come-at-things-from-the-side post, and perhaps it is, (upon reading the finished mess..I know  it is…sorry)  but I think it’s important to just attempt a broader understanding instead of constantly stabbing at individual statements.

This is what I have said about Pope Francis’ words since the beginning of his pontificate: they are largely untethered from the the depth and breadth of Catholic tradition.  That is not saying he does not believe it.  It’s saying that he apparently has little use for much of it in his public speech. It’s not his point.

I could site many examples, but this “you are not a Christian” tic serves the purpose well. Popesplainers tell me that what he means is that authentic discipleship or deeply dedicated faith or radical faith is characterized by these features: joy, memory, coherence, forgiveness, and that is undoubtedly true.

But the repeated judgment of individuals or types in this way is problematic. It’s theologically inaccurate, and is just not a part of Catholic language. It seems to me an overly simplistic way of articulating the challenges of Christian discipleship. It’s a clean finish, it seems to stick the landing, it gets your attention, but what is it, really?

Every preacher, they say, has one sermon, and they preach that one over and over. The trick though, in preaching or even teaching, is to allow your own interests and priorities to dialogue with the material at hand, not dominate it.

So I, as a teacher, may have a deep interest in the history of women in Catholicism, but if I am teaching a high school church history class and I work that interest into every single lesson, and use the lessons mostly as a hanger for my hobbyhorse,  I’m allowing my priorities to shape the message to an unhelpful extent. What am I trying to do here? Am I really interested in inspiring my students to learn as much about the big picture as possible, or in the end, is my own personal vision limiting theirs?

When I read Pope Francis’ homilies and speeches, for the most part,  I don’t experience an exploration of the Scriptures as they are, or a presentation of a particular facet of Catholic teaching or devotion. I don’t get the Big Catholic Picture. In fact, there is even a sense that the Big Catholic Picture might function as a wall between  a person  and Jesus, rather than the bridge to him.

His habit is to find an angle in the text or moment at hand to make the point he has in mind, and there are in general just a few of those to pick from. The Scripture, the day, the place, the interview question serves as an opportunity to elucidate one or more of his favorite themes: mercy, inclusiveness, accompaniment, hypocrisy, and the plight of the materially poor.

And what’s so bad about that? Who votes against more mercy and justice? Not me!

But the ultimate effect is a bit impoverished. As I said, it is not so much the richness of the Scriptures that are preached, but Pope Francis’ priorities and themes.  It is, to me, another expression of the tendency I previously wrote about: a pope’s priorities shaping the exercise of the papal office rather than humbly dialoguing  with it and all that underlies it.

As I said every preacher does this to a certain extent.  I know a priest who never fails to bring up death. He’s old. It’s on his mind. Another priest homilist, obviously a neat and well-organized fellow, tends to regularly bring up the beauty of God’s plan of salvation and how it all fits together pretty nicely.

The trick is, as I said before, to be careful to let the Scriptures and the Church speak through your own particular charism and yes, priorities.

What I hear in Pope Francis’ words are his favorite themes. What is missing is the broader, deeper context of Catholic life, tradition and teaching. Maybe you don’t miss it. I do. I like for all that stuff to be summed up and reflected and flowing through Catholic-talk.

One might argue, “But it’s pastoral” and “What, you expect a theology dissertation every time a pope opens his mouth? So hard to understand! This line-drawing is so much simpler and easy to apply to everyday life!”

Nope. I don’t expect dissertations in homilies. That would be terrible.  But here’s the thing. Every time I go to Mass in Alabama, I hear homilies that my eleven-year old can understand, homilies that acknowledge and embrace the brokenness of the human condition from a place deep, secure and confidently flowing from Catholic tradition. They are not all great, but they are trying.

I hear homilies that reflect the joyful belief that the gift of faith we meet in Catholicism reflects two things: it reflects life and it reflects God’s answer to life, met in Christ and given to us through his Body, the Church.

That Catholicism is not imposed on life. Is not an extra. Its philosophical and theological ground is simply the ground of life, articulated, written, prayed, sung and even suffered through.

And it for sure – for certain – is not presented as an obstacle to Christ, as something to shrug off, minimize and skirt around, as barriers to the real Christ, the loving, accepting Christ.

So what does this have with the Trump thing? Well, this: Catholicism is no stranger to the issues of movement of peoples; of refugees; of the right of nations to live in security ; of the rights of people to find decent, safe, homes. There are innumerable facets to the immigrant situation as it relates to the US, Mexico and Central America: crime, poverty, exploitation, accommodation and political games.

What Catholicism brings to this table is far more than assertions that building walls is not Gospel teaching and reflexively pulling out the “not a Christian” card.

It’s not really about the Church (insert harrumph here) staying out of politics.  Catholicism is the oldest continually existing political body in the world. Empires, monarchies, city-states, revolutions, nations, republics, warmongering popes, peace-making popes, you name it, we’ve been there.  We have a lot to say about politics and political movements and the movement of peoples.Been there, done that, still doing it.

So, the Trump thing? What was said here and has been in situations like this is predictable. It’s the way the Pope speaks and sees things, evidently.

The fundamental issue, though, is why. What moves the Pope and his people to present his off-the-cuff remarks and answers in this way? Why the insistence that his thoughts on or his reaction to any of this matter? Why the highlighting of his own personal priorities and constant presentation of them through, for example, these daily homilies, as the focus of Catholic interaction with the world today?

Because aren’t we about decentralization?

And isn’t he just the humble Bishop of Rome?

Right?

 

 

 

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It’s usually happened on Gaudete Sunday, but for some reason this year the Blessing of the Bambinelli – Benedizione dei Bambinelli  – occurred on the Fourth Sunday of Advent, today.

The group that organizes it is the Centro Oratori Romani and you can check out their Facebook page here and their regular website here.

Lots of great photos from the event – one that might have been replicated in your parish or school over the past couple of weeks, and if it wasn’t…it’s never too early to start planning.

The photos below are from the Centro Oratori Romano Facebook page. 

The Vatican Radio story

Hey…someone should write a children’s book about that….

You can purchase it on Amazon here.

Or from me here.

 

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Today is his feast! Begin, as we like to do, with the grounded and pastoral catechesis of #B16:

In these past months we have meditated on the figures of the individual Apostles and on the first witnesses of the Christian faith who are mentioned in the New Testament writings.

Let us now devote our attention to the Apostolic Fathers, that is, to the first and second generations in the Church subsequent to the Apostles. And thus, we can see where the Church’s journey begins in history.

St Clement, Bishop of Rome in the last years of the first century, was the third Successor of Peter, after Linus and Anacletus. The most important testimony concerning his life comes from St Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons until 202. He attests that Clement “had seen the blessed Apostles”, “had been conversant with them”, and “might be said to have the preaching of the apostles still echoing [in his ears], and their traditions before his eyes” (Adversus Haer. 3, 3, 3).

Later testimonies which date back to between the fourth and sixth centuries attribute to Clement the title of martyr.

The authority and prestige of this Bishop of Rome were such that various writings were attributed to him, but the only one that is certainly his is the Letter to the Corinthians. Eusebius of Caesarea, the great “archivist” of Christian beginnings, presents it in these terms: “There is extant an Epistle of this Clement which is acknowledged to be genuine and is of considerable length and of remarkable merit. He wrote it in the name of the Church of Rome to the Church of Corinth, when a sedition had arisen in the latter Church. We know that this Epistle also has been publicly used in a great many Churches both in former times and in our own” (Hist. Eccl. 3, 16).

An almost canonical character was attributed to this Letter. At the beginning of this text – written in Greek – Clement expressed his regret that “the sudden and successive calamitous events which have happened to ourselves” (1, 1) had prevented him from intervening sooner. These “calamitous events” can be identified with Domitian’s persecution: therefore, the Letter must have been written just after the Emperor’s death and at the end of the persecution, that is, immediately after the year 96.

Clement’s intervention – we are still in the first century – was prompted by the serious problems besetting the Church in Corinth: the elders of the community, in fact, had been deposed by some young contestants. The sorrowful event was recalled once again by St Irenaeus who wrote: “In the time of this Clement, no small dissension having occurred among the brethren in Corinth, the Church in Rome dispatched a most powerful Letter to the Corinthians exhorting them to peace, renewing their faith and declaring the tradition which it had lately received from the Apostles” (Adv. Haer. 3, 3, 3).

Thus, we could say that this Letter was a first exercise of the Roman primacy after St Peter’s death. Clement’s Letter touches on topics that were dear to St Paul, who had written two important Letters to the Corinthians, in particular the theological dialectic, perennially current, between the indicative of salvation and the imperative of moral commitment.

 

NOW….back in 2012, nearing the end of our epic fall in Europe, we were in Rome on 11/23, and purely by chance ,the wonderful Basilica of S. Clemente was on our agenda that day. We wandered over there, toured the Basilica (a second time for us, but the boys were little the first time and of course didn’t remember it), and then, in the neighborhood…encountered a festival. A festival for S. Clemente of course!

Over on Instagram, I have been doing a 3-year anniversary day-by-day (sort of) retrospective of our trip. I skipped a few days because those were the days we were in Assisi, I’ve posted a lot of Assisi photos over there before, and then life got in the way, but I’m back today.

 

You can’t take photos inside the Basilica, so this was a close as I got.

 

amy-welborn

The feast, complete with procession, was so great, I took some lousy videos.


Loved it. Messy, imperfect, enthusiastic, rooted in history, public, welcoming all. Catholic.

Finish up with more from B16:

The action of God who comes to meet us in the liturgy precedes our decisions and our ideas. The Church is above all a gift of God and not something we ourselves created; consequently, this sacramental structure does not only guarantee the common order but also this precedence of God’s gift which we all need.

Finally, the “great prayer” confers a cosmic breath to the previous reasoning. Clement praises and thanks God for his marvellous providence of love that created the world and continues to save and sanctify it.

The prayer for rulers and governors acquires special importance. Subsequent to the New Testament texts, it is the oldest prayer extant for political institutions. Thus, in the period following their persecution, Christians, well aware that the persecutions would continue, never ceased to pray for the very authorities who had unjustly condemned them.

The reason is primarily Christological: it is necessary to pray for one’s persecutors as Jesus did on the Cross.

But this prayer also contains a teaching that guides the attitude of Christians towards politics and the State down the centuries. In praying for the Authorities, Clement recognized the legitimacy of political institutions in the order established by God; at the same time, he expressed his concern that the Authorities would be docile to God, “devoutly in peace and meekness exercising the power given them by [God]” (61, 2).

Caesar is not everything. Another sovereignty emerges whose origins and essence are not of this world but of “the heavens above”: it is that of Truth, which also claims a right to be heard by the State.

Thus, Clement’s Letter addresses numerous themes of perennial timeliness. It is all the more meaningful since it represents, from the first century, the concern of the Church of Rome which presides in charity over all the other Churches.

In this same Spirit, let us make our own the invocations of the “great prayer” in which the Bishop of Rome makes himself the voice of the entire world: “Yes, O Lord, make your face to shine upon us for good in peace, that we may be shielded by your mighty hand… through the High Priest and Guardian of our souls, Jesus Christ, through whom be glory and majesty to you both now and from generation to generation, for evermore” (60-61).

 

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