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Posts Tagged ‘Lent Daily Devotional’

This past week, the fruits of some past labors came to fruition all at once. That’s the way it is in writing, even in the age of so much instant publication. What you write today will come to light in a year or so, which means if you’re writing religious stuff, you’re often off, liturgical-year wise, writing about Christmas in May and Easter in November.

Last week, I mentioned that I received my copies of Praying with the Pivotal Players. Right now, you can get it as part of the entire study program and order it individually through the WOF website. It’s on Amazon, but I have no idea when it will actually be available.

"pivotal players"

Then on Saturday, I received a box containing my copies of the 2016 Advent devotional Daybreaks published by Liguori. This is an annual publication, and I’m honored to join the roster of authors who have contributed in the past. A Spanish language edition will also be available – and I also wrote the Lent 2017 devotional as well. 

Advent 2016 Daily Devotional

 

Lent Daily Devotional

So if you are responsible for ordering such materials for a diocese, school or parish..please consider this!

Sunday the 18th, the Living Faith daily devotional was written by me.   Before that, I’d contributed the September 4 devotion.

Also last week, I made De-Coding Da Vinci available in pdf form. More here. 

Also …with the feast of St. Francis of Assisi coming up, remember that I have copies of Adventure in Assisi to sell – signed or not, your choice! Go here for information on that. 

assisi

 

And now…time to get to work this Monday morning on things that will be published next fall…

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  1. Here’s a short interview I did with Catholic Book Blogger Pete Socks on the JPII Biblical Way of the Cross:
  2. In the interview I refer to an article about Beth Holloway, the mother of Natalee Holloway, the young woman who disappeared while in Aruba on a class trip. The family was from Birmingham, and the article is in a local magazine. I was struck by the powerful encounter that Beth Holloway – a Methodist – had with a Stations of the Cross in Aruba.  I quote it in the interview, but I’ll do so here as well:

The first few years after 2005 were a search for answers more so than a search for happiness; it took a moment of revelation at a small Catholic church in Aruba for Holloway to begin moving forward again after Natalee’s disappearance. Holloway was raised as a Methodist, with a mother who taught her that God is good, and a grandmother who told her, “Lay your burdens at the cross.” On her fourth morning in Aruba, those lessons came into sharper focus for Holloway. She found a taxi and asked the driver to take her somewhere to pray. “He pulled over and there was a large white cross, and he told me to get out of the car, and as I did, I walked to the cross and just fell to the cross on my knees and just started crying and begging and praying to God to give Natalee back,” she says. “I got up, and I went to next cross, repeated my same prayers and dropped to my knees and kept praying and crying and begging for God to give her back.”

After days of searching for her missing daughter, Holloway says she was in unbearable pain. Though she was unfamiliar with the Catholic tradition of the stations of the cross, she instinctively went from cross to cross, each time seeking an answer. Finally, on the fifth or sixth station, she found one. “Complete peace blanketed me, and in that instant somehow I then knew that Natalee was with God, and I knew that he had cared for her through whatever ordeal she had encountered that night, and that’s when I became at peace,” she says. “When my grandmother was always saying, ‘Lay your burdens at the cross,’ I got, at that point, what she was saying. I laid the burden of caring for Natalee at the cross. The work to find out what happened to her had to be done, but the burden was taken from me.”

 

When Catholic churches embody the Gospel in its art, architecture and devotional objects, and those churches are open – people encounter Christ.

"amy welborn"3. Today’s Gospel is Matthew 25:31-   . Years ago, Mike brought together Bishop Robert Baker and the late Fr. Benedict Groeschel to write a book called When Did We See You, Lord?  Read more about it here. 

 

 

So, yes, mercy. How does it happen? How does God communicate his mercy and love to this hurting world? Through us, and in many ways, first and most importantly through one person’s outreach to another.

But also, this:

To construct churches that tell the story of Jesus through their design, art and even just their very presence among us, standing firm in the midst of the city or as a quiet faithful herald on a country road; to erect a roadside shrine; to paint and sculpt images and symbols that bring the Gospel and the saints who have embraced into into the present moment – and to make the sacrifices necessary to  keep it all open and available to any and all passers-by?

That’s a work of mercy.

 

 

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Today – Thursday after Ash Wednesday – is the commemoration of Our Lady of Lourdes.

Living Faith has a special Lent daily devotional booklet. They don’t put the entries online as they do with the regular devotional (my last entry in it is here), but the e-version of the devotional is only .99 and is available here.  Today happens to be one of my entries, "amy welborn"and you can read it if you click on the “look inside” feature and scroll down a bit. 

A preview:

“If anyone wishes to come after me, he must deny himself
and take up his cross daily and follow me.  Luke 9:23

                Perhaps I have made some plans for  Lent. Perhaps I have worked out what my daily cross shall be:  Extra prayer times and practices I’ll take on; particular pleasures I’ll forgo; works of mercy to which I’m committed. 

                After all, intentionality and a thoughtful spiritual plan are good things.

                But I’m struck that on this first full day of Lent, I’m also invited to consider how God’s grace moves in completely unexpected ways in quiet corners of life.    MORE

(Another .99 daily Lenten devotional? You got it – right here.)

If you would like to share the story of St. Bernadette with your children, Loyola has my entry on her from The Loyola Kids’ Book of Saints online here. 

Bernadette was afraid, of course, but it wasn’t the kind of fear that made her want to run away. She stayed where she was and knelt down. She reached into the pocket of her worn-out dress, found her own rosary, and started to pray with the girl. When she finished, the girl disappeared.

Bernadette didn’t know who or what she had seen. All she knew was that being there had made her feel happy and peaceful. On their way back to Lourdes, she told her sister and friend saintswhat had happened, and soon the whole village knew.

Over the next few weeks, Bernadette returned to the grotto and saw the beautiful girl several times. Each time she went, more people went with her. Although only Bernadette could see the girl in white, when the other villagers prayed with her in the grotto, they felt peaceful and happy too. Those who were sick even felt that God had healed them while they prayed.

During those moments in the grotto, the girl spoke to Bernadette only a few times. She told her that a pure, clear spring flowed under the rocks. She told her that people needed to be sorry for their sins. And near the end, the girl said one more thing: “I am the Immaculate Conception.”

Bernadette had no idea what this meant. She repeated it to herself over and over on her way back to the village so she wouldn’t forget the strange, long words. When she told her parish priest what the girl had said, he was quite surprised.

That grotto, from our 2012 trip:

 

"amy welborn"

"amy welborn"

 

Many more photos and comments here 

 

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Yes, tomorrow’s the day.

I’d recommend sticking with some good, meaty, challenging out-of-the-comfort-zone older spiritual writings – such as I’ve been linking over the past few days. Homilies of popes and saints, theological and spiritual treatises that address you as an adult called to discipleship and responsibility for your choices are always good, rather than writings that assume you are a child about to stomp away if you feel as if you’re excluded or unwelcome or are confronted with the shadows in your life.

But …if you want something not ancient or there’s someone you know who is looking for some Lenten material on short notice, you could check these out. They’re available as e-books and apps so  you can grab them at this late date – or later.

My devotional Reconciled to God. Ninety-nine cent! As we say down South.

 

"amy welborn"

 

Free. The Power of the Cross. 

"amy welborn"

 

 

 

 

The Bible study I wrote for Loyola – on the Passion in the Gospel of Matthew.  

 

 

"amy welborn"

 

Just looking for a more general prayer book to download? Try the Catholic Woman’s Book of Days.  Get it instantly, read it on the Kindle app on your phone.

"amy welborn"

 

 

 

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— 1 —

Today is always such a sad day, even more so as the years go on – I read things I wrote over twenty years ago on life issues and, well, I could have written them today.

 

— 2 —

A couple of examples from the archives – forgive the simple formatting – they are from my original website, and very basic in appearance.

Teach your children well

We can send a man to the moon….

– 3—

As it happens, I penned today’s Living Faith entry. It’s here. 

At the end of Mass, the celebrant felt moved to add a word of thanks. The choir, normally very good anyway, had risen to particularly stunning heights. So he thanked the musicians for their nottheenemydedication. “And,” he added cheerfully, “thanks to our baby choir too!”

That morning, as usual, the baby and toddler voices had echoed through the cathedral as well. I don’t think anyone minded, and if they did, the celebrant’s words of gratitude undoubtedly gave them food for thought.

More

— 4 —

Well, I suppose I will throw in my Thursday Homeschool Daily Report here, since it’s late and it’s short.

The informal homeschool classes that are held at the Cathedral started up again today – drama and history of science – so that was the morning’s activity (for him…me? To a coffeeshop with pad and paper…the only one there not on a laptop…). Then lunch, then just a couple more things – math review sheets and some Writing and Rhetoric – chapter 2, doing more on narratives and copiousness – replacing dull, ordinary adjectives and nouns with exciting, vibrant and enticing words. By that point it was time to do a bit of practice then head out to piano lesson.

Finis. 

— 5 —

Random Lent Prep link: Some Lenten sermons of St. Francis de Sales. 

Maybe if you read them, you can have your best. Lent. ever! 

— 6

Oh, this was good – from Brave Writer. Countering the argument (such as it is) that the best way to make writers out of kids is to put pencils in their hands at the age of 4 and push technical grammar awareness in first grade, with five-paragraph essays mastered by 3rd.

Imagine if you tried to teach your young speaker to talk by correcting every sentence/phrase, by parsing the grammar and commenting on the organization? What if you determined the topics for speaking and deemed certain topics “off limits”? What if speaking were limited to one portion of the day?

Am I taking this analogy too far?

I don’t think so. Speaking is seen as a necessity because it is modeled around us all the time by everyone. We assume that all kids will learn to speak and that every topic is relevant because speaking is about communicating…

Hmmmm. Are you starting to see what we’ve done to writing?

 

— 7 —

Reminder – if you’re teaching First Communion prep…maybe consider this book?

Also, my bookstore is open – I don’t have everything in stock, but I do have lots of the picture books. If you are an administrator or pastor or otherwise generous person and are interested in some sort of bulk deal, let me know at amywelborn60 – at – gmail.

Hey…Lent begins in less than a month….

Time to order your parish/school materials – even if you want to order some for a group of friends or a class…here you go!

A Stations of the Cross for teens:

"amy welborn"

Biblical Way of the Cross for everyone:

For Ave Maria press, we wrote John Paul II’s Biblical Way of the Cross. The current edition is illustrated with paintings by Michael O’Brien.

"amy welborn"

There’s also a digital edition in app form.

Reconciled to God – a daily devotional. Also available in an e-book format. Only .99.

amy-welborn-3

Looking for a book study for a group? How about Matthew 26-28: Jesus’ Life-Giving Death from Loyola. 

"amy welborn"

For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum!

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Yes, one month from today…is Ash Wednesday…

Welp, as I always say, “The sooner Lent starts, the sooner it’s over!”

If you’re on the lookout for resources for yourself, your kids or your parish or school, take a look at these. It’s not too late to order parish resources. Many of these are available in digital formats, so it’s never too late for those:

  • Reconciled to God, a daily devotional from Creative Communications for the parish.  You can buy it individually, in bulk for the parish our your group, or get a digital version. (.99)amy-welborn-3

"amy welborn"

 

amy-welborn3

  • The Word on Fire ministry is more than the Catholicism series – as great as that is! There are also some really great lecture series/group discussion offerings.  I wrote the study guide for the series on Conversion – a good Lenten topic. 

"amy welborn"

  • A few years ago, I wrote a Stations of the Cross for young people calledNo Greater Love,  published by Creative Communications for the Parish. They put it out of print for a while…but now it’s back!

amy-welborn4

  1. "amy welborn"

"amy welborn"

 

Looking ahead to First Communion/Confirmation season? Try here. 

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Sooner than you think.  Ash Wednesday is February 18 – about a month away.  Time for parishes and programs to be ordering materials, for sure.

  • Reconciled to God, a daily devotional from Creative Communications for the parish.  You can buy it individually, in bulk for the parish our your group, or get a digital version. (.99)amy-welborn-3

"amy welborn"

amy-welborn3

  • The Word on Fire ministry is more than the Catholicism series – as great as that is! There are also some really great lecture series/group discussion offerings.  I wrote the study guide for the series on Conversion – a good Lenten topic. 
  • A few years ago, I wrote a Stations of the Cross for young people called No Greater Love,  published by Creative Communications for the Parish. They put it out of print for a while…but now it’s back!

amy-welborn4

Looking ahead to First Communion/Confirmation season? Try here. 

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