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Posts Tagged ‘Ireland’

St. Patrick's Well, Orvieto

What is this and what does it have to do with St. Patrick? See the end of the blog post…

From The Loyola Kids’ Book of Saints:

How do you teach a classroom that’s as big as a whole country? How do you teach a whole country about God?

St. Patrick’s classroom was the whole country of Ireland and his lesson was the good news of Jesus Christ. How in the world did he do it? Well, it was only possible because he depended totally on God.

….

God gave Patrick the courage to speak, even when Patrick was in danger of being hurt by pagan priests who didn’t want to lose their power over the people.

Patrick’s most famous prayer shows us how close he was to God. It’s called “St. Patrick’s Breastplate.” A breastplate is the piece of armor that protects a soldier’s heart from harm.

Christ with me, Christ before me,
Christ behind me, Christ within me,
Christ beneath me, Christ above me,
Christ at my right, Christ at my left.

"amy welborn"

I also  have a chapter on the beautiful Lorica prayer – or St. Patrick’s Breastplate in The Words We Pray. You can dip into it here and buy the book here. It’s one of my favorites of those I’ve written. 

The point of St Patrick to me has always been he went back.  He (like Isaac Jogues and many others) returned to the people who had caused him much suffering. Why did he return? Because he knew, first hand, that they needed to hear the Gospel. The Gospel is about forgiveness and reconciliation. Who better to bring it to them?

St. Patrick's Breastplate

St. Patrick’s Breastplate in a Wordcloud. Wordcloud made via this. Feel free to share. 

The photograph at the top of the blog post is of St. Patrick’s Well in Orvieto, Italy. No, St. Patrick never traveled to Italy, and no one thinks he does, either. The assumption is that the name of this very deep, intriguingly constructed well is derived from the awareness of “St. Patrick’s Purgatory” in Ireland, a cave so deep it led to Purgatory. 

This incredible 16th century feat of engineering is 72 meters (174.4 feet) deep and 13 meters (43 feet) wide.  Two staircases circle the central opening in a double-helix design, meaning that one person (or donkey carrying empty buckets) can travel down the staircase in one direction and never run into another person (or donkey carrying full buckets) coming up in the other direction.  Seventy-two arched windows in the interior wall of the staircase filter light through the well and illuminate the brick and mortar used to seal it.

Why does a tiny town on top of a plateau of volcanic rock (or “tufa”) have such a thing? For the same reason it has such a stunning duomo!  After the troops of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V sacked Rome in 1527, Pope Clement VII was held hostage in Castel Sant’Angelo, Rome’s holy fortress, for six months.  He finally escaped dressed as a servant and took refuge in Orvieto. It was the perfect spot with its vantage point over the valley.

It didn’t, however, have a reliable source of water without descending from the plateau, something the Pope feared could be a issue if it were sieged.  To solve the problem before it existed, Pope Clement VII commissioned Antonio da Sangallo the Younger, a visionary young Italian architect, to create a well that was at that time called “Pozzo della Rocca”, “Well of the Fortress”. Research had already been done to find the most suitable spot for a well and so the design and construction of Pozzo della Roca was begun immediately.  It was finished 10 years later in 1537, under the reign of Pope Paul III.

It wasn’t until the 1800′s that the well got its new name, as it reminded some of the “well” or “cave” in Ireland called “St. Patrick’s Purgatory”.

 

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Okay, this is funny.

Now, parts of it are just wrong and really off about the Mass – whoever wrote it hadn’t been to Mass in a while and/or had really hazy memories of what happens, when and how.   And it definitely reflects a most superficial version of modern Irish cultural Catholicism.

But just know that my daughter said, “Mom, you have to watch this.  You’ll think the music part is hilarious.”

It is – in a really painful way.  Painful because it’s true, not just in regard to the past it represents (WAAAAAY back in the 1980’s), but also in terms of the now.  In short: Think you’re all cool and down with the kids now.? Fine.  Just wait…..

The show?  Moone Boy, from Chris O’Dowd. 

I’ve watched the first two episodes now (this – Godfellas – is #5) – and I give the series an “Eh” – it’s amusing at times, fun for the late 80’s references, definitely not kid-friendly, although I do "moone boy"like the conceit – O’Dowd plays the imaginary friend of this very well-played and charming boy growing up in western Ireland in the late 80’s.  It shows flashes of authenticity here and there, but there’s also a sort of shallow meanness and neutrality towards weirdness that I find off-putting.

And maybe the portrayal of the er, pastoral musician here is part of that, but maybe because I resonate with the critique I can look past the shallow meanness in this case.. Guilty as charged.

But oh…

“When we sing for the Baby Jesus it’s never awful..…Usually”

(If you watch, note the dissonance, in the first Mass scene,  between the music book in the stand and what’s actually being sung.  Snort.  How can that not be intentional?)

(Also, the frantic search for “some kind of black leather footwear” was….familiar.)

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