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Posts Tagged ‘BBC4’

Seven Quick Takes

Sorry. SexyTime is over!

— 1 —

Well, last week, it was Ben Hatke with good news, and this week it’s Gene Luen Yang, who was awarded a McArthur “Genius” Fellowship.  Yang is the author of some excellent works, including AMERICAN BORN CHINESE and the 2 volume BOXERS and SAINTS. Catholics might have first “met” him as the creator of a really good “Rosary Comic Book” published by Pauline Books and Media in 2003. Yang is Catholic and up until last year, worked in a Catholic high school in Oakland.

So great to see Yang’s fine work recognized in this way.

(By the way, Hatke is on a short book tour right now in support of his new series, Ordinary Jack…and Birmingham is on the list! Looking forward to meeting him next week.)

— 2 —

Good news: my favorite podcast, the BBC4 history-themed series In Our Time has returned for a new season. I haven’t yet listened to the first episode, aired Thursday, on Zeno’s Paradoxes, but I did catch up this past week with an excellent episode on Margery Kempe.

kempeFor those of you who don’t know, Kempe was a medieval English mystic. She experienced her first vision of Christ after a profoundly difficult post-partum experience, bore thirteen more children, then started having more visions and going on pilgrimages. Her account of her life and visions was well known, but, of course, the Reformation Vandals took care of that, and – this, I didn’t know – a complete version was unknown to the post-Reformation world until 1934, when a copy was found in a cabinet in which someone was looking for ping-pong balls. You can read about the story of the discovery, and theories as to how this copy survived and got to its finding place here.

— 3 —

This jibed nicely with some reading I’ve been doing for a project on women and the Reformation, only serving to reinforce my convictions about what a disaster the Protestant Reformation was for women (not to mention most other aspects of life in the West) and contribute to my inexorable, steadily growing aggravation with the apparent approaching canonization of Martin Luther.

It’s going to be a loooong 500th anniversary, and..

wehavenoliquor

 

But wait! We do! Never mind. We’ll get make it. God’s got this!

 

 — 4 —

Also on the listening front: this episode of The Food Programme, another BBC radio show I really like. This episode told the story of Charles Green, who was the cook on Shackleton’s Endurance expedition. Oh, what a tale. Green lived until 1973, and for a time, gave talks to groups with slides that Shackleton had given him, slides which he unfortunately felt necessary to sell when times got hard.

There is one audio recording of an interview with Green, and in the program, his own voice is interspersed with the narration of Gerard Baker , who has served as a cook on modern Antarctic expeditions. The account of what Green had to and did accomplish to keep the men alive, as healthy as possible and, in a sense, spiritually fed is quite moving. It is a reminder of all that goes into human accomplishment, and how most of it is unseen and unheralded.

 

— 5 

Today is the memorial of Padre Pio – or, more formally, St. Pius of Petrelcina, by far the most popular saint in Italy. His image is in every church and more shops than you can count. …..The relic of his heart has been in Boston over the past couple of days. Domenico Bettinelli writes a bit about it here and has links to other accounts. And oh, you must see the photos. So moving.

6–

Here’s a good blog post. Timothy O’Malley, director of the Notre Dame Center for Liturgy, on why “Chant is Good for Children.”

Last Sunday, we went to the Melkite Liturgy on campus. The entire liturgy, as anyone knows who has attended Eastern liturgies, is sung. Despite our son’s lack of familiarity with the words on the page, he hummed along the entire time (sometimes even during the Eucharistic Prayer). With his slight speech delay, with his limited grasp of understanding of English, the chant allowed him to participate in the Eucharistic sacrifice in a way that he rarely experiences.

Not once did he ask to leave.

Not once was he bored (though he did perform frequent prostrations and crossing of himself).

To this Catholic, we have to admit that music too often functions in our parishes as quaint interludes between the rationalism of speech. Our liturgies are wordy, sounding more like bad speeches than prayer. Why would anyone believe that we’re participating in the very liturgy of heaven itself?

If this is heaven, perhaps, I don’t want it. It seems really boring.

The chant of the Roman Missal should be normative in our parishes. Priests should learn to sing. We should chant the readings, the Psalm, the Creed, the Intercessions, the Eucharistic Prayer, the Pater Noster. Everything that can be chanted.

Years ago, I made a similar observation, also partly inspired by the experience of Eastern Catholic liturgy:

The organic integrity of the chanted liturgy. I must say that is attendance at the Eastern Catholic liturgies that helped me understand the concept of “singing the Mass” as opposed to “singing at Mass.” Chant is, I think, the natural language of vocal prayer – not recitation, but chant, even if that chant is nothing more than a sing-song. There was one aspect of this last liturgy that was recited – the prayer before reception of Communion. But that was it.

— 7 —

Get some copies! Spread the word! There will be a Spanish-language edition as well. 

Advent 2016 Daily Devotional

For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum!

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In Our Time…again

I keep nagging you about the BBC4 radio program In Our Time, and I just want to make sure you are taking me seriously.

Listen to it. 

There are hundreds of episodes from which to choose on all matters cultural, literary, historical and scientific.  It’s a far better use of  42 minutes of your time that you spend doing chores, driving somewhere or exercising than the latest episode of Ellen or some such.

In short: it’s a discussion program between host Melvyn Bragg and three academics.  There has been preparation, of course.  Melvyn has had his notes, and the program is tightly structured, but it never gives the sense of being scripted.  Real discussions and disagreements happen, and as an added treat, the podcasts now include about 5-10 minutes of post-broadcast discussion.

I’m always deeply impressed by the lack of cant and ideology, and, when it’s a factor, the fair treatment of religion.

I’ve only started listening to one episode that I just couldn’t finish, and that was on the whale.  I can dredge up enough interest in, say, the Corn Laws to forge on, but the evolutionary journey of the whale…no.  Don’t care.

So the latest:

The program on the Baroque was lovely.  I was ready to hear the Baroque dismissed as so much superficial fanciness, but I should have known better.  The discussion was quite illuminating, emphasizing that Baroque design and architecture was an expression of the meeting of heaven and earth – finding a way to let heaven burst into the earthly realm.

The microscope?  Another intriguing discussion of the impact of accumulating scientific work.

Hadrian’s Wall – Why there and how?  Also, most intriguingly to me, as always, questions of historiography and contemporary archaeology, for only a very small percentage of Hadrian’s Wall has been excavated, and new discoveries are continually being made.

The Domesday Book broadened my understanding of the Norman Conquest and gave voice to differing views on its impact, and, by extension, much food for thought on unintended consequences of historical events.

The program on the 1884 Berlin Conference in which Africa was carved up by European powers was a really bracing, enlightening romp through palm oil, Stanley and Livingston, King Leopold of Belgium, the fading Ottoman Empire, the complexity of Africa and Africans as agents, not just victims,  and more.  Really, one of the best of the series, and that’s saying  a lot. 

 

 

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