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Archive for the ‘Homeschool Daily Report’ Category

Well, hello.

I have so many ideas and blog posts and such crawling around in my head, but no real quality time to think them over and then actually write them.

Time exists, but for this introvert, it’s not the right kind of time.

I think what has really screwed me up over the past couple of months is that I lost my high school carpool because of the other kid’s participation in both (very early) morning and afternoon athletic practices, and we’ve  not reconnected since it’s gone to afternoons only, so I don’t even know what’s happening there. Eh, only a few more weeks and new arrangements are already in the works for next year, so I can deal. But that eats up a couple of hours a day. The afternoons are okay because M and I are often out and about in the afternoons anyway, but the mornings..oy. I take the high schooler, and by the time I get back, I need to be thinking about the other one’s school –  which is not too taxing, since I know 97% of what I think will be happening and am always ready for him to just take the lead on what he wants to do for the day – but still. It’s brainspace.

So shall I put what’s on my mind  here and hold myself accountable? What needs to be written in the next few days?

(I also have two manuscripts to read – one another soon-to-be published book, and the other a YA historical novel by one of my older sons..plus two articles to write…)

  • Amoris Laetitia. It’s a challenge to write about, not only for the usual Pope Francis-related reasons (his thinking, writing and rationale are unclear, highly idiosyncratic and float free from most of 2000 years of Catholic tradition. That doesn’t say it’s opposed to that tradition, necessarily. It says he doesn’t bother with tying his arguments to it except in terms of the most general values. ) – but also because every day, one or two really interesting articles on the matter are published and I think…well I needn’t bother. But then I keep thinking and….

I also don’t want to produce another thousands-of-words declamation on the subject. For your sake. So I’m trying to hone in and really get to the point, and my point(s) pops up at a different place on the coordinate than what I have read elsewhere, so it might be worth saying.

  • School. We are chugging along. I haven’t had the opportunity to do the daily homeschool reports, but hope to offer you a few more before the school year ends. I think they might be helpful, not as guides – not at all – but as examples of what one family does. Maybe you’re not as crazy as you think.

 

  • Oh, here’s one anyway. This will be easy -except for the rabbit holes, which are the best part, and which I usually take notes about as we go along, but didn’t today, because we were on the road.

We began with the readings of the day, a short prayer, then cursive practice. No copywork or dictation, just a page of cursive practice. His handwriting is getting pretty good, and he just needs to work on speed. Then just a few pages of math review from Evan-Moor books – these 6th grade problems. (He’s in 5th grade, but he can handle most of it.)

Then we hit the road!

Not far. Just a bit south. First stop was the Hoover Library – the best branch library around here, always busy, good collection. We checked out some CD’s – the soundtrack to Gladiator, some Beethoven, and then a bunch of books about Italy, and some random new books – this one about Back to the Future, and then this, which looks interesting. For his casual reading, he’s flying through Stuart Gibbs, whom he finds amusing.

(He just came in and asked how long War and Peace is.  We looked it up. He says he might read it after he finishes his current books.  I’m thinking if he’s serious I’ll tell him that he can be done with school for the rest of the year. I mean…I don’t think he’s interested in the plot..I think it just exists in his consciousness as This Big Iconic Thing.)

Check out, hop back in the car, and keep going south, to a swamp. It’s this preserve, part of the University of Montevallo. A friend of mine had been there a few weeks ago with her kids and seen lots of animals. It’s a nice walk, and we enjoyed our conversation and our observations, but the only animals we saw were a skink, an anole, lots of bees and a few nice fat tadpoles. M was of course hoping for snakes and I beavers, but nope. Just tadpoles.

 

amy_welborn44

Isn’t this odd? I’d never seen so many woodpecker holes in such a pattern.

Lunch, drive back, listening to the Gladiator soundtrack, talking Roman history and music.

  • Better Call Saul. Coming right up.
  • Books.
  • Trip planning….let’s move that to another post, shall we?

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— 1 —

Almost done. MAN I am ready to be done with this. It’s not a huge project, but it’s been in the front of my brain for two months and I’m ready to think about something else. I should finish it this evening (Friday), thank goodness, because I have possible articles about Better Call Saul and Walker Percy on the horizon over the next few weeks, a trip to plan, plus an actual paper book to read and a television show (season 2 of the BBC’s Happy Valley) to watch.

Oh. Taxes. Thanks for reminding me.

"amy  welborn"

— 2 —

I wrote about Dorothy B. Hughes here – her The Expendable Man was very interesting, dealing with racial issues and abortion in a mid-century context, in ways that might surprise you. I wrote about season one of Happy Valley here – also with a surprising life-related angle.

– 3—

Yeah, yeah. An exhortation, too. I’ll get to it. I’ll let everyone else have their say, first. More efficient that way.

 — 4 —

As usual, the Homeschool Daily Reports become less daily by the end of the week. Some highlights: After “The Open Window” he read “The Interlopers” also by Saki. I said, “Where you surprised at the ending?” He said, “No, because you know the story couldn’t happen without something bad happening.” This time I printed out an unadapted version the first time around, and I used this as a supplement for discussion. Part of the discussion (and I mention this just to show you how the Homeschool Rabbit Holes work) began with the concept of the omniscient narrator. Well, first off, he didn’t know what “omniscient” meant, so we picked it apart, along with omnipotent and omnipresent. We talked about how those are attributes of God. Then we swung back around to literature, looked for evidence in the story of an omniscient narrator and then talked about other examples of non-omniscient third person narration, and then touching on first person point of view.

— 5 

I think we’re done with copywork, and will do only dictation from now on. The blogger at this site said that is what she does – go to this link for a good explanatory series on copywork/dictation – and it struck me that yes, it’s time. He’d gain much more from writing passages being dictated (after studying them) than copying at this point. So this week, I had him grab the book he was currently reading – Spy Camp – and pick out a passage he liked. He found one, he copied it yesterday, and then I dictated it to him today. The lessons contained in this sample were spelling of a couple of challenging words and the use of punctuation within quotation marks.

— 6–

Watched some videos over the last couple of days. Highlights were:

The Hip History video on the Indian Removal Act.

Brain Scoop on explaining taxonomy via candy, water beetles and Death Rocks. Love Emily Graslie!

 

— 7 —

And…books. As I wrote here, I have some copies of Prove It God, plus all the picture books. Get your First Communion gifts!

 

 

For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum!

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  • I am at the very tail end of this project. It’s at the stage in which the major motivation is how fantastic it’s going to feel when you don’t have it hanging over your head anymore. Imagine! Wow. That will be great. This weekend, we hope.
  • We started out today talking about vultures. Wait, no.
  • We actually started out today with him leafing through Family Guide: Italy while sitting on my bed and him opening to pages on Pitigliano, reading it, and saying it looked really interesting, and me saying that well, that was actually a place I had been considering for a base because it looked really interesting to me, too. Kind of weird. Then he told me about what one of his instructors in the history of science homeschool class had told them about going up the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Then, vultures. I think.
pitigliano

Calling our names

  • When we were at the Avian Conservation Center in Charleston, the docent told us about the crisis in the South Asia vulture population. Not that I didn’t believe her, but it was pretty interesting when an article about that very issue popped up on a science news feed today. The issue was a drug – diclofenac –  given to cattle in India, a drug which is fatal to vultures. Since cattle are not eaten in India, when they die, vultures are depended on to take care of the carcasses. Cattle were filled with this fatal drug. Vultures died, which not only wiped out the population, but gave other species – more dangerous to humans – opportunities to flourish and along with it things like rabies. So we talked about that.
  • (I originally wrote “decimated” instead of “wiped out,” but then I remembered, as I always do when I think about using that word, being corrected years ago on another blog when I used the term as a synonym for near-total extermination, by someone who said, no, it actually means the loss of only ten percent, so stop doing it wrong, please)
  • I reviewed what Easter Season is, and how long it goes, and talked about Acts of the Apostles. We read today’s Mass readings and prayed.
  • Copywork today was a few lines of this poem, which I got from the great Garden Digestwebsite – if you are involved in teaching in any way and are seeking seasonal quotes and poems, this is the place to go. I first had him do a cold reading of it aloud, just to practice that skill.
  • “Now that the winter’s gone, the earth hath lost
    Her snow-white robes, and now no more the frost
    Candies the grass, or casts an icy cream
    Upon the silver lake or crystal stream;
    But the warm sun thaws the benumbed earth,
    And makes it tender; gives a sacred birth
    To the dead swallow; wakes in hollow tree
    The drowsy cuckoo and the humble-bee.
    Now do a choir of chirping minstrels bring
    In triumph to the world the youthful spring.”
    –  Thomas Carew, The Spring, 1630
  • He wrote the copywork in cursive.
  • For Latin, we translated a couple of chapters from this supplementary book and he did a page of parsing present, future and imperfect tenses of ire. (to go)
  • Next, since we are in between “school” reading, I pulled out a Saki short story – “The Open Window.”
  • I wanted him to read a hard copy, so I searched for “Open Window” “Saki” “pdf” and one popped up. I printed it. He read it. We started talking about it. I was about to raise one point about the story and started searching the printed text to help me make my point – I couldn’t find what I was looking for. I scanned it again. Where was that passage? Couldn’t find it. Then I realized that what I had printed out was some wimpy paraphrased version of the story. BAH.
  • I found another version – the correct version – and he read it. It was instructive because he could talk about the differences between the paraphrased and the original, and had no trouble saying that the dumbed-down version was, well, dumbed-down.
  • We talked about the story for a while, using questions from here as a starting point.
  • A few logic pages from this book.
  • He read the first section in the history text, which was about the beginnings of westward expansion, and then a chapter in A History of US about Sequoyah.
  • Then it was time for piano practice – the rest of the afternoon would be homeschool boxing, then get brother, then the last Nighttime Zookeeper’s Class at, well, the zoo, so it was our best chance. Three piano events coming up this month, so..gotta practice.
  • Timeframe without piano practice, 10-noon.
  • That’s it. Maybe a “full” day tomorrow…

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  • After an almost 2-week break (including most of Holy Week) we are back for the final push. As much as we push, which is not much.
  • We’ll  be in “session” until the latter part of May, when brother’s school dismisses for the summer and the real learning begins.
  • A late start – not only were we tired from the drive back from Charleston, I had to do final edits on my Living Faith contributions for the Oct-Dec issue.
  • (Next task…finishing up a Lent 2017 devotional….for once I was working on a seasonal project during the actual correct season. That’s rare.)
  • First up: Annunciation. Talked about the source of the word,then read the readings and prayed the prayers. Then he read the chapter on the event from the grade 5 volume of Faith and Life. 
  • Next, relating of a dream that involved The Matrix,The Regular Show and some other pop culture artifact.
  • Then, as we started Latin, he asked how, if the 3 Sisters had prophesied  that Macbeth would not be killed by anyone of woman born, how it was that MacDuff killed him? Um…let me explain….
  • That task done, time for Latin. Reviewed prepositions and adjectives from the last chapter, as well as the 3 tenses of eo, ire (to go). Moved on to the next chapter and introduced that vocabulary and its derivatives.
  • (I should add – no copywork. It was late and we were going to have to be short because of errands and early Brother School dismissal, so I just wanted to get the big stuff going for the week)
  • Poetry – we are reviewing the poetry he has memorized so far.  We started today with “No Man is an Island” and Dickinson’s “Hope.” He did well on both and came out with parts of “Blow, blow thou winter wind” even though he’d never purposefully memorized it, only done it for copywork and discussed it with me, and then did a paraphrase of “All the World’s a Stage.” Yes, we worked on As You Like It earlier in the year.
  • For writing, we started the next chapter of Writing and Rhetoric. Before Easter, the focus was refutation, and now, dealing with the same Bre’r Rabbit story, he will move on to confirmation. So today was just reading and thinking about that.
  • History: before we start the next chapter in the text, we’re filling in some gaps in social and economic history from A History of Us (volume 4) – chapters on transportation – canals, steam & the railroads.
  • Talking about the Erie Canal led to other things – first, the Panama Canal, then the Suez. Maps were pulled up, brief history discussed. Then the Amazon River was brought to mind, and the question of length relative to the Nile wondered about. So that question was pulled up, and the answer is fairly technical and not clear-cut. (Most agree the Nile is longer, but there are those who disagree). He then wanted to show me photographs of Mount Roraima which, he explained was part of the inspiration for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s book The Lost World which he tried to read once, but, he continued, did not finish because of the detail of description, especially since the bulk of it was contained in one character’s dozens-of-pages-long speech.
  • This brought to mind planet 55 Canri e, which he told me all about, mostly focusing the theory that because of the high temperatures of a side of the planet that permanently faces the sun, the surface of the planet might be diamonds (or not). We discussed what the plot of a story about such a planet might be.
  • We had great news (to me) in that Beast Academy 5B finally has a pub date – the end of this month. Since the topics covered involve fractions, we’ll stop what we’re doing with that and fill in the next couple of weeks with quick daily review sheets, logic and problem-solving. Today he just did a few pages from this book.

    We’ll be hitting science intensely over the next few weeks, since we still have a frog somewhere in the house waiting to be dissected, as well as a few other organs. But then…the weather has also turned into spring, and there are plenty of places to spend the homeschool day other than home.

    Afternoon errands included library, where he snagged the next couple of volumes of a series he’s enjoying for light reading. Boxing and the final zoo class tomorrow.

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Blogfodder first.   I hate linking to – hell I hate reading the Huffington Post, partly because it’s mostly boring predictable liberal agitprop but mostly because they don’t pay writers for providing content that makes the website money.

But this struck me as very true, so here it is. 

Simplicity Parenting encourages keeping fewer toys so children engage more deeply with the ones they have. Payne describes the four pillars of excess as having too much stuff, too many choices, too much information and too much speed.

When children are overwhelmed they lose the precious down time they need to explore, reflect and release tension. Too many choices erodes happiness, robbing kids of the gift of boredom which encourages creativity and self-directed learning.

It’s a useful argument to have handy: “You’re bored? Good. I’m just here to help. You’re welcome.”

— 2 —

True story:  11-year old just showed me a drawing of a space scene he’d done, describing the moment as “A cross between The Far Side and Mister Roberts.” 

(The theme being the character in the drawing feeling left out of the action and feeling a yearning to be involved in distant battles and adventures. The Far Side cartoon involved a wolf in the middle of a forest holding a desk job, apparently.)

– 3—

Very few Daily Homeschool Reports, I know.  School has certainly happened, but every day has been truncated by afternoon activities – some of our own design, like walking the trail behind the local Jewish Community Center – and some involving other homeschoolers. Park Day, Gym Day, etc. Too nice to stay inside.

"amy welborn"

 — 4 —

The most notable thing we’ve done this week is read and discuss half of The Red Pony.  I had never read it, but I have to say that I am being blown away by the depth of discussion this slim book is inspiring.  It is a tough book in some respects, but also a very good starting point for a young reader to dive deeply into motifs, themes and so on. It is probably all but impossible to teach in a classroom now, even the young teens who could be ready for it,  considering that it involves death and sorrow and other triggers.

— 5 

LOOK.

Ann Engelhart has illustrated a new book for Regina Doman’s Chesterton Press, a book written by Chesterton doyenne Nancy Carpentier Brown: 

Chestertons and the Golden Key

Doesn’t it look lovely? I can hardly wait to see a copy!

— 6–

Hey, guys, I will be at the Catholic Library Association/National Catholic Education Association meetings in San Diego on March 29-30.  I am for sure signing books at the OSV booth Tuesday at 2, and hopefully will be at one or two other publishers’ as well. If you are going to be there or have an educator friend who will, please tell them to say hello!

Oh – today’s my day in Living Faith. Check out the entry here. 

A couple of years ago, we visited the Federal Reserve Bank in Atlanta. There’s a tour there, during which you can peer through windows and see lots and lots of paper money being collected and sorted. At the end, you take away a little plastic bag full of shredded bills, once “worth” something, now “worth” nothing.

 

MORE

— 7 —

Speaking of books…order some from me!  Signed editions of any of the picture books (illustrated by Ann)  at 8 bucks a title.  Big orders for your entire First Communion class welcome! If you order in the next day or so, they will probably reach you by Easter.

For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum!

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…short day!

Today’s excuse was pi. The local science museum had advertised itself by proclaiming Pi Day and Einstein’s Birthday Day, so we marked off what we would have left of the afternoon (early dismissal at the high school) for whatever that would be about.

  • Prayer: Gospel and Morning prayer. Nothing exciting, got the job done.
  • Copywork was the first half of Psalm 23, which he will be memorizing this week.
  • A couple of practice cursive sentences from the handwriting book.
  • Math – we are working on operations with fractions from the 6th grade volume of the EnVision curriculum, just because it is around, leftover from brother’s life of three years ago.  Today was section 7.6 on subtracting mixed numbers. He got it, quickly.
  • We also watched a couple of videos on Pi.
  • Then we just quickly went over the next chapter in Latin – he will work on memorizing the vocabulary and the new verb – ire – to go – tomorrow. Discussing the vocab always entails lots of talk about derivatives.
  • Quick start to the next chapter of Writing and Rhetoric, in which he will write his first refutation essay – on a deceptively simple topic – a Bre’r Rabbit story.  It strikes me as ingenious. Don’t teach a fifth grader to write a refutation about some political or philosophical topic – teach him the mechanics of it by having him refute a folk tale.
  • Then…I gave him twenty minutes or so to go off and read through some of those National Geographics we snagged for free last week – then it was time to head to the museum..
  • Which was a bust. Look, we have been faithful patrons of this place ever since we moved here, but I’ve noticed a trend towards mediocrity and disrepair in the regular exhibits while attention and $$$ goes to special exhibits (which non members must pay more to see) – so for example the current Body World exhibit.  I wrote about it a couple of months ago when I recounted the conversation I had with my son about what it was all about and what my objections were.
  • So today – the Pi Day/Einstein Birthday activities were – handouts being distributed at the demonstration table in the main hall. One, a handout jut about Pi, the other a sheet to fill in with answers to questions about Pi, the answers to be found on pieces of paper taped to the wall around the museum. Oh, and you could make paper chain. Of circles.
  • I hate to be so critical, but honestly, you get five homeschool parent – or heck, 3 math teachers – on a committee, and they could come up with far more interesting activities than that.  Harrumph.
  • Well, we hung out anyway, and I said, “Okay, we’ve been here a zillion times, a third of the exhibits don’t seem to be working, but try to learn one new thing anyway.”  The new things he learned were about ginormous prehistoric turtles.
  • Oh, there was a bit more cultural education, as well. All I’ll say is that if your kid picks up volumes of Bloom County to read, you might want to brush up on your 80’s cultural trivia. “Who’s Leona Helmsley?” “Who’s Dan Quayle?” “What’s The Towering Inferno?” “Who’s Melanie Griffith?” “Who’s Oliver North?”
  • Oh, but there’s one major figure from the era I unfortunately don’t have to identify

bloom-county

 

  • After we got brother, we headed to do our Monday afternoon volunteering in the reading room, then as soon as we returned, M got the invite to go watch a HS baseball game, which he did, but the learning did not stop! For after he did his geometry homework, brother was climbing a tree, noticed an interesting-looking creature in a water-filled hole, removed it, and went through the process of identifying it – a rat-tailed maggot, larval edition of a drone fly.  Good to know.
  • And that was it. Latin verbs, refuting folk tales, Leona Helmsley, Pi, and prehistoric turtles. A day in the life.

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Here’s today Homeschool Daily Report, offered to the Interwebs as a witness to what one homeschooling day is like for one student in one corner of the universe. Take or leave.

  • Late start.  He was up late reading and drawing.
  • Prayer: Mass readings. Before that, a quick review of the sections of the OT (had him tell me what they are) and recitation of the books of the OT through 2 Chronicles.  Then talking about what the Wisdom books are (1st reading is from Wisdome today).
  • He read it aloud, then I mentioned how the dynamic described in the reading (go take a look) is quite real, even today.
  • Gospel. I read this one.  Quick review of geography (Galilee/Judea/Jerusalem).
  • Morning Prayers.
  • Rehashed the liturgical calendar for the next two weeks – 5th Sunday of Lent coming this weekend, then Palm Sunday, etc. Implicit, unstated relief on both our parts that the end is near and Lenten penances, while SO HELPFUL in developing spiritual discipline….are almost done, too.
  • No copywork, no illustration of past copywork either. It was late, and he’s been doing a lot of drawing this week.
  • Math: starter/revew problems from EnVision (they call it “Daily Spiral Review), then we went over section 7.5 of the 6th grade text, which was about adding mixed numbers. He did two practice pages, plus an enrichment page. Easy.
  • I mentioned that Monday was Pi Day plus Einstein’s birthday, and that we would go to the science museum on Monday to see what was up with that.  He mused about how if Einstein was alive he would be very gratified to know that even though people had not believed him at the time, what he said about black holes has been shown to be true.  We then talked about what scientific thinking takes: rigor and understanding of principles, self-confidence (he said) and imagination (I said.)
  • Then he asked, “What kind of shoe is a Tony Lama?”  A boot, I replied.  Pull up images on internet. Why? “Because it’s in Bloom County.”  Extensive narration of the context followed.
  • Then, you know what? Videos.  Several. Haven’t watched videos since last week. Time to catch up.
  • Started with Hip Hughes History on the War of 1812.
  • Then Brain Scoop about species identification – giving me a chance to reiterate, once again, that scientific knowledge is by no means carved in stone and is always, er, evolving.
  • An ostrich racing bicyclists from Laughing Squid.
  • Several from the Kids Should See This.
  • KQED has good science videos, too: we started with this one about a mouse that is resistant to a particularly virulant scorpion venom (he knew the kind of scorpion – bark – just by looking at it, before they identified it onscreen), this one on flesh-eating beetles (actually used in this research collection to help), and this one on squid skin. All quite interesting.
  • Then let’s watch the ostriches again.  And the baby sloths making cute sounds.
  • Last, I pulled out The Red Pony by Steinbeck, which will be the next “school” read. (This study guide, among others, will be useful)  I introduced Steinbeck, we looked at a map of that area of California, found Salinas and Monterey and talked about the places in the area to which we have traveled – Monterey, down to Big Sur, Santa Cruz, up in Silicon Valley (his sister had an internship in San Mateo three summers ago, and we visited), San Francisco, etc.
  • I told him it was a coming-of-age story and asked what he think those type of stories have in common thematically.
  • We then read the first couple of pages together. I highlighted the initial, opening description of Billy, isolating each physical aspect and asking what it communicates about Billy. Then I pulled the sentence, “The triangle picked him up out of sleep.”  and asked how that was different from just saying, “The triangle woke him up.”  What does that tiny difference communicate about that moment that a less vivid sentence does not?
  • He’ll read the first chapter for Monday.
  • All this time, we were sitting in the living room in front of the patio door, where we watched, first a couple of mourning doves just hanging out, which struck us as strange until we understood they were probably prepping to mate – there was a lot of strutting and preening happening – and then another, unfamiliar bird appeared, which we looked up and found to be a Northern Flicker. And then a cat strolled by, scattering them all.
  • Timeframe:  10:15-1. Followed by lunch, piano practice then off to pick up another kid at his school and head to a birthday party at a trampoline place way the heck on the other side of town. #Friday

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Here’s a fun website I just discovered – “fun” being defined as a geography/nature-oriented site that my youngest loves.  Amusing Planet – sort of like Atlas Obscura, but less complicated and more focused.  I like it. We like it.

— 2 —

Speaking of such things, check this out:

"amy welborn"

A cache of bound National Geographic magazines from the late 70’s, snagged from the “FREE” bin at our local 2nd and Charles – a used book/CD/DVD/Game chain that’s an offshoot of Books-A-Million (HQ here in Bham).

It pleased my youngest, who was thrilled to get a subscription to NG three years ago, but has of late soured on it, remarking that it is “too political and boring.”

I’m sure there is no scarcity of never-looked-at bound magazines out there, collecting dust in stacks and warehouses across the land before they are pulped.

– 3—

This is from last summer, but in the great tradition of “OMG AUDREY HEPBURN DIED” Facebook posts, just came across my feed this week.

Babies on display: When a Hospital Couldn’t Save Them, a Sideshow Did.

Close to a century ago, New York’s Coney Island was famed for its sideshows. Loud-lettered signs crowded the island’s attractions, crowing over tattooed ladies, sword swallowers — and even an exhibition of tiny babies.

The babies were premature infants kept alive in incubators pioneered by Dr. Martin Couney. The medical establishment had rejected his incubators, but Couney didn’t give up on his aims. Each summer for 40 years, he funded his work by displaying the babies and charging admission — 25 cents to see the show.

In turn, parents didn’t have to pay for the medical care, and many children survived who never would’ve had a chance otherwise.

Lucille Horn was one of them. Born in 1920, she, too, ended up in an incubator on Coney Island.

“My father said I was so tiny, he could hold me in his hand,” she tells her own daughter, Barbara, on a visit with StoryCorps in Long Island, N.Y. “I think I was only about 2 pounds, and I couldn’t live on my own. I was too weak to survive.”

She’d been born a twin, but her twin died at birth. And the hospital didn’t show much hope for her, either: The staff said they didn’t have a place for her; they told her father that there wasn’t a chance in hell that she’d live.

“They didn’t have any help for me at all,” Horn says. “It was just: You die because you didn’t belong in the world.”

But her father refused to accept that for a final answer. He grabbed a blanket to wrap her in, hailed a taxicab and took her to Coney Island — and to Dr. Couney’s infant exhibit.

Dr. Martin Couney holds Beth Allen, one of his incubator babies, at Luna Park in Coney Island. This photo was taken in 1941.

Dr. Martin Couney holds Beth Allen, one of his incubator babies, at Luna Park in Coney Island. This photo was taken in 1941.

Courtesy of Beth Allen

“How do you feel knowing that people paid to see you?” her daughter asks.

“It’s strange, but as long as they saw me and I was alive, it was all right,” Horn says. “I think it was definitely more of a freak show. Something that they ordinarily did not see.”

Horn’s healing was on display for paying customers for quite a while. It was only after six months that she finally left the incubators.

 — 4 —

Since Thursdays have been short, I’ve been tossing the  Daily Homeschool Report   for that day here. Short not that much longer, however, since yesterday was sadly the last day for the homeschool sessions that have been meeting at the Cathedral – major props to the mom who has organized and managed these mornings.  M has really enjoyed these six weeks of drama and science classes – the sessions ended with every group doing a performance, from the youngest singing and reciting the Hail Mary to a group recitation of “Casey at the Bat” from my son’s group performing a short play – Bean Soup. 

— 5 

We did squeeze in some more school in the afternoon. Fractions using the EnVision 6th grade book – as I mentioned, I have the text and CD with printables from my older son, so we are just going with that.  Finished up the War of 1812 with workbook pages from the text and some discussion of the experiences of soldiers in the war from the book of primary source material.  I know there were rabbit trails, but it was almost 24 hours ago, so I unfortunately have forgotten them!

— 6–

The Writing and Rhetoric chapter ended with an exercise in ordering paragraphs of an essay on the hardships the Pilgrims experienced, and I was pleased because it was actually more challenging and subtle than such exercises usually are.

Then a good practice – he has this sonata competition on Saturday, and although we might be a little tired of this piece, in a strange way, we are not – he is really discovering how interesting digging deep into a piece of music can be.

Speaking of music, our Cathedral music director has begun putting the Orders of Worship on line: Check them out, especially the “About Today’s Music” at the end of each one.  It’s just excellent catechesis.

— 7 —

 

Speaking of books…order some from me!  Signed editions of any of the picture books at 8 bucks a title.  Big orders for your entire First Communion class welcome!

For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum!

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  • So, sorry about that, not that any of you are breathlessly waiting for these things.
  • I was trying to think what has thrown me off since late last week. Well, maybe it’s:
  • Friday: Stations of the Cross
  • Saturday: basketball semifinal (lost)
  • Sunday: serve Mass at convent; piano recital
  • Then, Monday. Monday is usually a full day at home, but the piano instructor had a conflict with the usual Thursday time, so we moved the hour-long lesson to Monday at 1.  So now the week was shaping up as:  Monday – piano at 1.  Tuesday – boxing at 1, zookeeper class at 4:30. Wednesday – brother out of school, so good luck with that.  Thursday: Cathedral class in the morning. (last one)
  • Plus, I have a writing project due in three weeks (hahahaha), plus I need to plan my talks for the National Catholic Library Association meeting in San Diego.
  • So, okay school. This won’t be a daily report, nor will it have all those interesting rabbit trails, because I forget them.
  • Prayer:  the daily Mass readings, as per usual.
  • Math. As I mentioned, we finished Beast Academy, with no hint as to when 5B is being released except for the vague promise of “spring.” Which could mean June 20, for all we know.  So since the last section in BA was on expressions and equations, we did a bit of reinforcement of that with discussions and problems from Becoming a Problem-Solving Genius.  Then it was on to fractions – specifically adding and subtracting fractions with unlike denominators – the usual 5th grade stuff, and new to him. But I don’t have a 5th grade book, only a 6th grade book leftover from my older son – the Pearson Envision program, hated by many, but not hated by me.  I didn’t love it, but I didn’t think it was terrible. I liked that it demonstrated different approaches to problems. My issue was requiring mastery of all of those approaches – I thought the idea of presenting a number of approaches was that you would then be able to use the one that made the most sense to you.
  • But anyway, I still have the book, and the CD with all the practice problems and solutions, so we are just going to do the fractions chapter in that, and then probably go back to more problem-solving stuff, maybe even start on the AOPS Pre-Algebra book. 
  • Also did some Khan Academy on fractions, which we’ll continue as we proceed through the chapter.
  • History. The chapter in the text is Lewis & Clark and War of 1812.  He covered L & C last week, but I think we will not continue with the Burns video – it was good, but it’s so long, and he’s not that fascinated with it. So just move on.  For the War of 1812, he has bounced between the text, A History of  US and some library books.  Today (Wednesday) and tomorrow, he’s reading sections from Primary Source Accounts of the War of 1812, which led to a discussion of the difference between primary. secondary and tertiary sources in historical research.
  • As he read, we discussed who the presidents were, and can recite them through Jackson. I know it’s impressive to be able to reel all their names off through Obama, but it strikes me as a lot easier and more meaningful to just learn their order as you’re learning the history – just as we have done with the books of the Old Testament.
  • Oh, copywork. Forgot. We got three days in, and that’s going to be it, probably. Monday was a Scripture passage from the day’s readings. Tuesday (literature) was this from East of Eden:  “And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good.” Discussed what that might mean.
  • Today (poetry) was “A Prayer in Spring” by Frost. He wrote the whole poem in his copybook, and in our discussion, we focused on the line: “Oh give us pleasure in the flowers/in the flowers today;/And give us not to think so far away / As the uncertain harvest; Keep us here/All simply in the springing of the year.”
  • We discussed what that meant, beginning with the literal sense – why the harvest is uncertain – and moving on to metaphor: you don’t know what is going to happen in the future, so take joy in the present and live in it.
  • No “school” novel or short stories this week. He has been reading literally hundreds of pages a day of the Seven Wonders series in anticipation of the release of the 5th volume in the series, which happened on Tuesday. Unfortunately, libraries do not instantly place books on shelves the day they are published, and this is not a book I’m going to buy, so, well, patience is a virtue.
  • Latin has been prepositions all the way, which works win with reviewing what prepositions are all about in English as well.
  • Today, I sent him outside to find signs of spring and then come back in and tell me about what he found: the almost instantaneous reappearance of bees and wasps, budding trees, flowers and, in his narrative, the coolness of clover.
  • Science was inspired by his zookeeper class on Tuesday – birds were the focus, so he talked a lot about what he had learned by feeding the various birds mealworms, oranges and dead rats (vultures). Most exciting, though was the cassowary sighting. He has never been able to spy it on any of our previous visits – I don’t know where it hides – but this time, well, that was the big news. “I FINALLY saw the cassowary and its feet are AWESOME. They’re like dinosaur feet!”
  • Lots and lots of drawing happening lately – illustrating stories in his head.
  • The snake shed, so there’s that science demonstration happening right in his room, as well.
  • Writing and Rhetoric: still working on that chapter introducing refutation.  The interesting exercise from today, which actually had nothing to do with refutation, was a lesson on not overusing adjectives. He was given a paragraph, told to cross out all the adjectives, and then replace the previously modified nouns – which were all pretty ordinary nouns – with stronger nouns. The point being, to try to communicate something interesting about the person, place or thing, simply depending on strong nouns rather than adjectives.
  • So, with the addition of an intense hour of Beethoven work, a boxing class and time outdoors, that’s it.
  • Things coming up: Holi celebration at the museum Saturday, which we will try to hit after a piano sonata competition in which he is playing. Pi Day at the science museum on Monday.  

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— 1 —

Shall we stick the Daily Homeschool Report   here?  Yes, we shall.

— 2 —

Thursday is homeschool class at the Cathedral, with only one more week to go, sadly.

So that means no copywork and no home morning prayer. It’s get him up, feed him, and off we go.

Today his drama class practiced their play and his history of science class talked about Louis Pasteur.

After, we ran to the downtown library branch to pick up an armful of Smurf comics.  (More on that in a bit). Then home for lunch, had him talk to me about Pasteur, finish up Beast Academy 5A, and talk about the Writing and Rhetoric story, followed by several exercises (excerpts from Twain, Anne of Green Gables, etc)  asking him to look for unbelievable, improbable, improper or unclear.

As I said, it is prep for learning how to write refutations in a very ordered, but not at all boring way. It’s about instilling criteria in the mind so that one can give reasons for the case one is making.  I’m impressed with it.

 

– 3—

By this time, it’s mid-afternoon and rainy, so I pulled out the video of Ken Burns’ program on Lewis and Clark I had checked out of the library and we started watching it.  It’s pretty long – 240 minutes, but he was engaged, so I think we’ll just take it in 45 minute sections and watch it over the next week.

Piano practice, and that’s it.

 

— 4 —

Honest to pete, as they say, I had never before watched a Ken Burns doc. It’s quality, for sure, but stylistically so repetitive.  Gliding shot of river at sunrise. Voiceover from journal. Talking head. Gliding shot of river at sunset.

I guess there’s really nothing much more to do, right?

And the talking heads – maybe I’m just getting oversensitive as I age, but wow,  I just wanted to say BACK OFF, TALKING HEAD.  Really, pull that camera back even six inches, and I won’t reflexively recoil from you.

 

— 5 —

Proud that this conference on racial reconciliation is being held in Birmingham right now, held at a local Baptist divinity school and  co-sponsored by the Diocese of Birmingham

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Speakers include Bishop Braxton of Belleville, IL, the Archbishop of Owerri, Nigeria, and today the mayor of Charleston:

Riley recalled gathering the families of survivors together the night of the shooting as the police chief explained what happened.

“There was this choir of sorrow, wailing, crying, that will be with me as long as I live,” Riley said. “We told the community this was a hate crime. He came from 110 miles away. He wasn’t from Charleston. But he was from America. He wasn’t from another planet.”

The city, without a solid foundation in good race relations, could have responded in anger and with riots, Riley said. Instead, people of different races and religious beliefs gathered in front of the church, held hands and prayed.

“He came with hate, and we in this community would respond with love,” Riley said. “We decided we would take care of each other and we would pray. And we did.”

Riley spearheaded and is still working on a plan to build an African-American history museum on the site of the wharf where thousands of Africans were sold as slaves in Charleston, he said. “Forty-four percent of all slaves who came to North America came through Charleston,” Riley said.

Unfortunately, I can’t attend, but it looks really good.  Maybe we will try to sneak over at noon, but no, on second thought I think there is some big music audition/competition going over on that campus right now, besides classes, and a friend of mine was saying parking was impossible on campus, so probably not….

— 6–

Remember that Lent when your early idealism held and you indeed did not have cheese pizza for dinner every Friday?

Yeah, me neither.

 

— 7 —

Oh, to get back to the Smurfs.

Both of my younger boys, but especially the actual youngest, really like the Asterix-TinTin end of comics/graphic novels.  I’ve mentioned before that the youngest is also a big fan of the Lucky Luke series and occasionally asks if the Gaston series, which he encountered in a cabin in the Pyrenees and gamely tried to “read” in French, has been translated into English yet (nope).

Another short series he likes is Benny Breakiron by Peyo, who was also the author of the Smurfs comics.  I had suggested the latter to him before, but he’d always rejected it because what are Smurfs anyway but something for toddlers, right? (My only real encounter was with the animated series, which I never actually watched, but which made me itchy even just running in the other room. But I had read that the comics were different). The other day, he started reading one in the library, was hooked, and, as I said, asked to return to get like ten more.   I asked him why he liked them and he said he mostly liked how each of the Smurfs had a different personality.

And then he said he thought he had figured out where Calvin (of Calvin and Hobbes) lives.

(Illinois.)

Speaking of books…order some from me!  Signed editions of any of the picture books at 8 bucks a title.  Big orders for your entire First Communion class welcome!

 

 

 

For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum!

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