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Archive for the ‘7 Quick Takes’ Category

— 1 —

Another quiet week at the homefront.  Basketball, roof repair (finally!), brick-n-mortar school schedules and coldish weather keep us close to home these days.  But in a couple more weeks….we’re free! (-ish)

— 2 —

This week, I’ve been reading Captive Paradise, which is a history of Hawaii.  No, we’re not going there (although I’d love to!) – I’m just on a kick.  I read a history of the leper colony at Molokai, and this was on the “new releases” shelf at the library.  And then, as I started reading it, I noted that the author was talking about charging up against politically correct interpretations of history, and I was all in. 

I adore revisionist history – from any angle. I’ve always been just as interested in historiography as I am in history – may I blame my 9th grade history course at Knoxville Catholic High School which used a curriculum that was all about primary sources and interpretation?  Perhaps.  I’ll have more about it when I finish, but at this point, I’m really interested in the various interpretations of pre- and post-contact island life.

Although since everyone’s  – seriously, EVERYONE’S –  name  begins with “K,” I admit that I’ve given up on the details. Big Picture, people.  Big Picture.

— 3 —

Speaking of historiography, tonight while I was running , I listened to this week’s In Our Time, which was about the 4th century BC Indian king, Ashoka.  Ashoka is famed for converting to Buddhism and attempting to shape his kingdom according to Buddhist ethics.  What was fascinating about this program was the straight-up disagreement between the historians.  First we had two (young female) historians who told the story of Ashoka pretty straightforwardly, admitting a bit of ambivalence about the sources, but really not too much.  Then comes the Old Boy who basically says everything that’s been said so far is BS because reliable primary sources are non-existent.  Awkward!  It was a fascinating listen, not only for that but also to learn about later (and present-day) Hindu-dominated India’s neglect and outright ignoring of the Buddhist king who abhorred the caste system.

— 4 —

Speaking of my exercise…

I run/walk in a facility that has a track floating above a gym.

(Running around a track is certainly rat-in-a-maze-like, but it strikes me that doing a treadmill would be worse. So 80 laps it is!)

Last year, during intramural basketball season, I took note of a particular team and a particular coach, and I’m stupidly happy to be able to have them in my sights again this year as I run in circles above their games.

They are teenagers, and their coach is one of them – they’re maybe 16/17 years old.  But the thing is – and this is what I noticed last year – the kid who coaches…wears a tie, every single game.  Sometimes he sports a jacket it with it, and other times a sweater vest, but whatever, it’s hysterical.  I love it.  He stands at the sidelines like he’s Rick Paterno in his jacket and tie, coaching his friends, while the other side is coached by some dad being all casual in shorts and a t-shirt, and tonight, when they were losing by a lot, he grabbed someone’s jersey, threw it over his vest and tie, and put himself in the game for the last two minutes.

Everyone thinks they’re doing it like an individual…but only some of us actually are.

— 5 —

I was thinking I would try to do a learning post for Melanie this week, but with a writing deadline,  basketball on Saturday and a birthday party on Sunday, that’s not happening. So for now, I’ll just mention a couple of things:

This past week, Michael read this book, which is part of a 3-book series: Michael at the Invasion of France.  I am a firm believer in the “living books” pedagogy of history, either with non-fiction or historical fiction, and this was a great example of how well this works  It’s an excellent book (Joseph had read it a few years ago) about a boy involved in the French Resistance.  Her “author’s note” at the end about the role of children in the Resistance actually made me choke up a bit as I read it.

(My) Michael read it and then we’ve spent a couple of days working through the study materials Calkoven herself provides – background material as well as questions that (my) Michael discussed with me and wrote about.  Ample opportunity to discuss, not only the specifics of history but also issues of loyalty, authority, and resistance as well.

Last year at some point, I had let our subscriptions to the Cricket-group magazines lapse, but I recently renewed them – we subscribe to Muse, Dig, Odyssey and Calliope. Well, they all came this week…so there was a lot of “Go read some of the magazines.”  And I don’t even have to add , “And come talk to me about them,” because it’s like a tic with him.  As I’ve written before “narration” is a central aspect of the Charlotte Mason pedagogy, but with this one, I don’t even have to try.  I get narrated all. Freaking. Day. Long. 

— 6 —

So this happened this week:

I had purchased this book – Gods and Heroes in Art.  We have a couple of the saints-related titles  in the series, and they’re good, so since Michael is deep in the Percy Jackson books (again), I thought I’d add this to our considerable mythology collection.  I have lots of historical material, but nothing else specifically related to art.

We were leafing through it, and he paused at the “Perseus” entry.

“Wait,” he said, “I’ve seen that.  Isn’t that at our museum?”

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Find the credits.

Why, yes it is.

If you had asked me? Not in a million years would I have remembered ever seeing that painting before in my entire life.

I mean…what? 10. Years. Old. Barely.

Now. Can you please remember to put your shoes in your closet? 

Thnx.

— 7 —

 (Repeat from last week and the week before…but…still pertinent)

Lent is coming!  Full list of resources here, but take special note today, if you don’t mind, of these Stations of the Cross..and pass it on to your parish!

John Paul II’s Biblical Way of the Cross, published by Ave Maria Press.  This, again, is available as an actual book and in a digital version, in this case as an app.  Go here for more information. (The illustrations are by Michael O’Brien)

"amy welborn"A few years ago, I wrote a Stations of the Cross for young people called No Greater Love,  published by Creative Communications for the Parish. They put it out of print for a while…but now it’s back!

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— 1 —

Lent is coming!  Full list of resources here, but take special note today, if you don’t mind, of these Stations of the Cross..and pass it on to your parish!

John Paul II’s Biblical Way of the Cross, published by Ave Maria Press.  This, again, is available as an actual book and in a digital version, in this case as an app.  Go here for more information. (The illustrations are by Michael O’Brien)

"amy welborn"A few years ago, I wrote a Stations of the Cross for young people called No Greater Love,  published by Creative Communications for the Parish. They put it out of print for a while…but now it’s back!

amy-welborn4

— 2 —

Podcast listening?  Not much of great interest this past week, since I’m mostly concentrating on that Couch to 5k thing.  I’m up to Week 8! 28 minutes! (But that’s on an indoor track – we’ll see what happens when I am able to go outdoors again, given the harder surfaces and more, er, varied terrain outside.

So, Melvin lost me this week with Phenomenology. I tried – I really did, but listening to philosophy talk about Husserl, Heidegger and meaning through earphones while running with youth basketball going on below was pretty much a lost cause.  What was interesting was this program on Zola in England.  After the Dreyfus trial, Zola fled to London – by doing so, he enabled keeping the case open.  While in England, he began work on his last series of books, the first of which was called Fecundity or Fruitfulness – and, although Zola is a hard slog (I read Lourdes – barely), the premise is fascinating and timely – in which Zola blames oppressive social and economic systems for discouraging the lower classes from reproducing, decrying contraception, abortion and child abandonment….

— 3 —

I’m currently reading The Colony, which is about the history of the leper colony at Molokai. The origins of the place are so sad, an example of incompetent and deceptive government action in the face of tragedy.

Related, but somewhat contrasting is this fascinating story that provided me with a brief excursion down the rabbit hole this past week:

In 1803, King Charles of Spain ordered an extraordinary expedition: Smallpox was, of course, taking a terrible toll on the Spanish colonies so…..

On September 1, 1803, King Charles IV of Spain, who had lost one of his own children to smallpox, issued a royal order to all royal officers and religious authorities in his American and Asian domains, announcing the arrival of a vaccination expedition and commanding their support to

  • vaccinate the masses free of charge,
  • teach the domains how to prepare the smallpox vaccine, and
  • organize municipal vaccination boards throughout the domains to record the vaccinations performed and to keep live serum for future vaccinations.

The expedition to vaccinate the population in South America against smallpox was a public health undertaking of staggering proportions. A small group set out by ship and horse to traverse present-day Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Panama, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and Bolivia, carrying the vaccine and administering it in villages and cities along the way. The territory was not only vast but also brutally harsh, with precipitous mountains, dense jungles, and uncharted rivers. The expedition traveled in primitive riverboats and on mules when the terrain was too rugged for horses.

First Destination: Puerto Rico

The María Pita left the Spanish harbor of La Coruña on November 30, 1803, with the smallpox vaccination expedition team consisting of a director, Dr. Francisco Xavier Balmis; an assistant director, Dr. Jóse Salvany Lleopart; and several assistants and paramedics. The ship reached Puerto Rico in February 1804 with its cargo of vaccine serum preserved between sealed glass plates; also onboard were 21 children from the orphanage at La Coruña who carried the vaccine through arm-to-arm vaccinations performed sequentially during the ship’s journey, and thousands of copies of a treatise describing how to vaccinate and preserve the serum, recounts José Rigau-Pérez in an article on the smallpox vaccine in Puerto Rico.

More here and here. 

— 4 —

I’m going to try to do a learning post tonight, but in short, this week was a week of lots of science (properties of matter, heat transfer), art (printmaking) and puzzles (logic chapter of Beast Academy)

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Also, here’s a fun thing:  Hit the Lego store when the staff is unpacking a shipment and you just might find yourself the recipient of big bags of random pieces they don’t have room to stock in those bins on the back wall….and it might be your lucky day.

— 5 —

Through reading H. Allen’s Smith’s The Pig in the Barber Shop, I discovered a book called Father Juniper and the General, "amy welborn"written in the late 50’s by another American ex-pat in Mexico named James Norman.  It’s in the Don Camillo – Father Malachy genre – priest does battle with and outwits local civil/social authorities, and it’s amusing.  I’m surprised I’d never heard of it, considering I thought I’d read or at least heard of every vaguely Catholic themed middle-brow book published in the US in the mid=century when I was editing the Loyola Classics, but apparently not!

— 6 —

I actually accompanied my kids to the movies the other day (they are old enough to go on their own, together now) – Big Hero 6, which was…good!  As usual with movies today (get off my lawn!) the climactic battle goes on waaaaay too long, but the setting – a mythical more Far Eastern version of San Francisco – was fascinating and the animated characters were surprisingly well individuated.

Speaking of movies: over the holiday weekend, we watched Strangers on a Train, which I enjoyed for some fantastic set-pieces and Robert Walker’s compelling performance, and didn’t enjoy for the mostly-stiff other performances and off-putting amoral tone surrounding the murder of Granger’s wife and the “happy ending” of him and his paramour.  I just thought that was so weird.

Also, The Trouble With Angels, which I hadn’t seen in a while, but is so good. Still. I had remembered the Hayley Mills’ character’s embrace of religious life as more of a surprise, and while it is a bit of a twist, the really observant viewer can see it coming, and her spiritual discomfort and awakening is sketched rather well, as she confronts her own fears about getting old and dying , encounters mercy again and again in the Rosalind Russel’s Mother Superior, and observes the ties of family among the sisters, a kind of family she’s never experienced herself.  It’s based on a memoir called Life With Mother Superior by Jane Trahey, a female pioneer in advertising, and the Hayley Mills character is based on a friend of hers who really did go on to become a Dominican Sinsinawa! 

— 7 —

 

Better Call Saul actually looks like it might be…good.  When it was first floated, I thought, “Oh, no….” and when it was announced as a thing, I thought, “Not a good idea.”  But in reading about the show’s premise, in which there are actually emotional stakes at work and seeing previews, I’m getting excited.  I’ve read a couple of reviewers who opine that it’s better than BB…hard to imagine,but… Love the logo!

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— 1 —

.Then there was the night the tree fell on my house….

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— 2 —

Last Saturday night, some big storms swept through here, and about 7:45, we heard and felt a serious THUD.  I could see some branches from the back patio glass doors, and thought it was just that – branches.  Until I ventured further and saw..no it was A TREE.

It’s not too bad.  Exterior damage and a little bit of damage inside a closet.  As the tree guy said, “It could have been worse.” (It usually could have, in anything. Remember that.) Specifically, if this were a newer home, it probably would have taken that whole wall out.

The good thing about homeowner’s insurance is that at this point, the adjustor and the roofing guy are figuring it out, so most of the time, I forget that it even happened.

— 3 —

10-year old has been bumped up in his music lessons – out of regular leveled curricula into mo’ serious stuff.  Bach’s First Invention, a Beethoven Sonatina.  It’s a transition, to be sure, so to ease it, I’m going Suzuki for a while and practicing the pieces myself, as well as adding in my favorite Invention from lessons past - #4.

— 4 —

Podcasts, podcasts…well, I’m still focused on Couch to 5k, and have finished week 7, still alive – running 25 minutes at a time. It’s probably deceptive though, since it’s on an indoor track. Once the weather warms up again (57/8 is my threshold for outdoor running. *Wimp*), I’ll take it back outside and we’ll see how I cope on the slightly hilly course I usually take.

Other than that, recently, I listened to the Great Lives podcasts on Louisa May Alcott and Dorothy Sayers and finally got in the last episode of the really excellent 3-part series called Global Classical Music – A New World Symphony an exploration of the explosion in popularity of Western Classical music outside of Europe. Really worth a listen, and the last moments, in which an Indian teacher explains the importance of this music – without denigrating his own important musical traditions – moves into the final strains of (of course) Dvorak’s New World Symphony  – are quite moving.

— 5 —

The only field trip we took this week was a short, but meaningful one  – to the research branch of our Central public library downtown. The research building, connected by an above-the-street walkway to the newer building, was actually the original public library.  It boasts some wonderful murals which you can read about  – and see better versions than I was able to photograph – here. I found the murals in the former children’s room particularly lovely.  A different world.

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View down into main research room.

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Closer view of mural in children’s room – fairy tales and such.

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Long view of former children’s room at Birmingham Library.

— 6 —

 I read Dawn Powell’s A Time to Be Born this week.  I generally enjoyed it – it was enjoyable mean in its depiction of highflown self-important New York media culture before the war (supposedly, one of the central characters is modeled on Clare Booth Luce, although Powell always denied it), but I found it a bit padded.

The other day in a used bookstore I picked up a copy of H. Allen Smith’s The Pig in the Barber Shop a travelogue of a trip to Mexico, published in 1958. I love old travel books – I find them to be an interesting way to read history, and I especially am always on the lookout for descriptions of Catholic Stuff, descriptions which are far more helpful in understanding the past than the presumptions and ideological narratives of the present.

Smith was a prolific journalist whom I only know because of his book, and the movie based upon it, Rhubarb, about a cat who inherits a baseball team.  I think I read that book half a dozen times as a kid.

I’m enjoying this one – and bonus – I opened it up, and found that it was signed by Smith!

— 7 —

 LENT IS COMING. 

Get your resources here!!

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  1. My son had a piano recital last weekend.  He reported:”You know that thin girl who played after the two bigger girls? Well, she was backstage talking, and do you know what she was talking about? She was talking all about The Illuminati. She was saying that the Illuminati were behind 9/11 and Apple was run by the Illuminati because the price of the first Ipad or something was 666 dollars or something and that the Illuminati are sending a message through that ‘What Does the Fox Say’ song because the sounds that one of the animals make is the Latin word for ‘destroy.’

    “Oh….”

    “And then when she was done, do you know what the other two girls started talking about?”

    “No…”

    “My Little Pony.”

    2.  Today is the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe.  The devotional for today in Living Faith was written by moi.  You can check it out here - Living Faith has started posting all of their devotions online on that designated day.  "amy welborn"

    Also…if you’re thinking you want to learn more about the Blessed Mother…check out my free e-book, Mary and the Christian Life.  

    3.  Still time for Christmas shopping - if I could recommend….The Catholic Woman’s Book of Days for..a woman?  Or Bambinelli Sunday or Adventures in Assisi  – signed by both Ann Engelhart and I – for a child.  Any of my/our children’s books for your favorite catechist or parish library.  The How to Book of the Mass for someone you know thinking about returning to the Church this Christmas.

    "amy welborn"Reminder:  I have all of Ann’s and mine books in stock, signed by both of us.  If you have trouble with Paypal, shoot me an email at amywelborn60 -at – gmail.com

    4. Speaking of Bambinelli Sunday – it’s this weekend.  You can hear Ann and I talking about our books with Monsignor Jim Lisante all over the Catholic radio, including the Catholic Channel on Sirius XM. This weekend’s Bookmark on EWTN is also with us.

    5.  Quick learning notes:   I recommend the Khan Academy videos on music.  Even though my 10-year old knows his musical notation, it was useful to watch these videos, which review notation, and then demonstrate the principles with various musical scores.  Really good.  We’re slowly working our way through the videos about musical instruments, as well.

    6.  I had a book signing last weekend at the Ave Maria Grotto bookshop – if you’ve ever passed the signs for the Grotto on I-65 and thought about stopping in…do it!  I’ve been a few times before, but really, it’s an amazing treasure of replicas of Catholic sites throughout the globe built with found materials.  It’s not cheesy, it’s wonderful.  At the book signing, I met a group of sisters who have recently settled in Cullman and are helping out at the school and with other ministries, I assume.  Young, enthusiastic…adding to the very interesting Catholic mix of central Alabama.

    7. Math with snake. #homeschool.

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    Go check out more 7QT at This Ain’t The Lyceum. 

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Today’s their feastday.  Back in 2006, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI spoke about them at a General Audience, part of a series on the Apostles:

Simon is given a nickname that varies in the four lists: while Matthew and Mark describe him as a “Cananaean”, Luke instead describes him as a “Zealot”.

In fact, the two descriptions are equivalent because they mean the same thing: indeed, in Hebrew the verb qanà’ means “to be jealous, ardent” and can be said both of God, since he is jealous with regard to his Chosen People (cf. Ex 20: 5), and of men who burn with zeal in serving the one God with unreserved devotion, such as Elijah (cf. I Kgs 19: 10).

Thus, it is highly likely that even if this Simon was not exactly a member of the nationalist movement of Zealots, he was at least marked by passionate attachment to his Jewish identity, hence, for God, his People and divine Law.

If this was the case, Simon was worlds apart from Matthew, who, on the contrary, had an activity behind him as a tax collector that was frowned upon as entirely impure. This shows that Jesus called his disciples and collaborators, without exception, from the most varied social and religious backgrounds.

It was people who interested him, not social classes or labels! And the best thing is that in the group of his followers, despite their differences, they all lived side by side, overcoming imaginable difficulties: indeed, what bound them together was Jesus himself, in whom they all found themselves united with one another.

This is clearly a lesson for us who are often inclined to accentuate differences and even contrasts, forgetting that in Jesus Christ we are given the strength to get the better of our continual conflicts.

Let us also bear in mind that the group of the Twelve is the prefiguration of the Church, where there must be room for all charisms, peoples and races, all human qualities that find their composition and unity in communion with Jesus.

st.  Simon St. Jude

Then with regard to Jude Thaddaeus, this is what tradition has called him, combining two different names: in fact, whereas Matthew and Mark call him simply “Thaddaeus” (Mt 10: 3; Mk 3: 18), Luke calls him “Judas, the son of James” (Lk 6: 16; Acts 1: 13).

The nickname “Thaddaeus” is of uncertain origin and is explained either as coming from the Aramaic, taddà’, which means “breast” and would therefore suggest “magnanimous”, or as an abbreviation of a Greek name, such as “Teodòro, Teòdoto”.

Very little about him has come down to us. John alone mentions a question he addressed to Jesus at the Last Supper: Thaddaeus says to the Lord: “Lord, how is it that you will manifest yourself to us and not to the world?”.

This is a very timely question which we also address to the Lord: why did not the Risen One reveal himself to his enemies in his full glory in order to show that it is God who is victorious? Why did he only manifest himself to his disciples? Jesus’ answer is mysterious and profound. The Lord says: “If a man loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him” (Jn 14: 22-23).

This means that the Risen One must be seen, must be perceived also by the heart, in a way so that God may take up his abode within us. The Lord does not appear as a thing. He desires to enter our lives, and therefore his manifestation is a manifestation that implies and presupposes an open heart. Only in this way do we see the Risen One.

The paternity of one of those New Testament Letters known as “catholic”, since they are not addressed to a specific local Church but intended for a far wider circle, has been attributed to Jude Thaddaeus. Actually, it is addressed “to those who are called, beloved in God the Father and kept for Jesus Christ” (v. 1).

A major concern of this writing is to put Christians on guard against those who make a pretext of God’s grace to excuse their own licentiousness and corrupt their brethren with unacceptable teachings, introducing division within the Church “in their dreamings” (v. 8).

This is how Jude defines their doctrine and particular ideas. He even compares them to fallen angels and, mincing no words, says that “they walk in the way of Cain” (v. 11).

Furthermore, he brands them mercilessly as “waterless clouds, carried along by winds; fruitless trees in late autumn, twice dead, uprooted; wild waves of the sea, casting up the foam of their own shame; wandering stars for whom the nether gloom of darkness has been reserved for ever” (vv. 12-13).

Today, perhaps, we are no longer accustomed to using language that is so polemic, yet that tells us something important. In the midst of all the temptations that exist, with all the currents of modern life, we must preserve our faith’s identity. Of course, the way of indulgence and dialogue, on which the Second Vatican Counsel happily set out, should certainly be followed firmly and consistently.

But this path of dialogue, while so necessary, must not make us forget our duty to rethink and to highlight just as forcefully the main and indispensable aspects of our Christian identity. Moreover, it is essential to keep clearly in mind that our identity requires strength, clarity and courage in light of the contradictions of the world in which we live.

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— 1 —

Mass last Sunday was a cappella. The organ had to be covered with a ginormous tarp because of plaster work being done in the loft.

I have to say, it was lovely.  It really is my preference, no offense to all the musicians out there.  A chanted monastic liturgy, Eastern Christian liturgies resonating with the human voice…yes.  Seems to me it’s the way it should be.

At one point, I presented the worship aid, with the words of the Gloria, in Latin, closer to my 9-year old’s face.  He waved it away and whispered, “We had to learn it in schola.” 

Well. My bad.

— 2 —

Speaking of music in our cathedral, this past Monday the cathedral hosted the debut performance of a new (independent) music group in town, the Highland Consort, specializing in Renaissance Polyphony. It was a stunning performance.  We sat in the rear of the main center aisles, which were full, it seemed to me.

As I sat there, I listened and I also watched people listening. And I thought, “This is evangelization.
Because why? Because there  during that hour you have a few hundred people sitting in a Catholic church listening to Catholic sacred music (the program had all the lyrics in Latin and English – easily understood), and you could see people, as the music flowed over them, letting their gaze wander around the church. They watched the ensemble, but that’s not all they saw.  Their heads turned, their necks craned as they looked around at the saints in the stained glass, up at the ceiling painting, over at the paintings of the sacramental symbols in the sanctuary, at the altar, the statues of Mary, Joseph, St. John Vianney and St. Paul…there were not only in a church, but they were in the midst of the Church, surrounded by a cloud of witnesses, some silent, some beautifully audible, past and present, transcending time and space, surrounded by the proclamation of the Good News in visual art, music, symbol, structure and hospitality, and guess what….all were welcome.

— 3 —

Speaking of stained glass, our weekly jaunt took Michael and me up to Huntsville.  I wanted to revisit the science center that we frequented last fall when the older boy was doing First Lego League. It’s moved and I wanted to check out the facilities…we were disappointed to see that it really wasn’t an improvement and everything looked, in fact, a little more tired.

So after a very short visit, we headed over to Lowe Mill, an old mill (obviously) that has been transformed into studio space for artists.  Not a lot of artists were working (I’m guessing more of them of present on weekends), but we could peek through windows at quite a bit of interesting work.  One fellow who was in was working on this:

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…for a church in Kentucky, and we got a bit of instruction on his technique, which is…painstaking.

— 4 —

I exercise regularly, but I decided this week to revisit the Couch to 5K program which I’d done and finished several years and, it seems, lifetimes ago.  This time I started at week 4, which was no trouble and really just the right spot.  Now,  I didn’t know there were lots of different versions of Cto5k you can download, and the first one I randomly downloaded was…not my style of music.  It was sort of weird.  But then I stumbled upon the versions produced by the ever-helpful NHS, and, well…if you want…entertaining encouragement, I highly recommend giving this version a try.  I mean, what is more helpful than a woman urging  you in a gentle British accent Well done! and Off you go! 

— 5 —

Speaking of British people talking in my ear while I walk and run in circles, Melvin Bragg is back in business with a new season of In Our Time, which I once again, as is my wont, encourage you to try out.  I’ll admit that the first two topics were challenging for me – I couldn’t tell you much more about the number “e” now than before I “listened” to the program, and the next one, on a very important 7th century battle between   Arabs  and  Chinese  lost me after fifteen minutes.  BUT…the third episode was on Rudyard Kipling and it was really good, giving a thorough and fair treatment of his life in India, his business-savvy writing career, his time in America, how he felt about America, World War I, his verse.  Good stuff.

— 6 —

Nothing like waiting until exactly a month before you leave the country to renew your passport.  Good job, me!

— 7 —

Next week, I’ll be spending a lot of time with Jim and Joy Pinto!

Monday, I’ll be on their EWTN radio show, which airs at 2 eastern, and then Thursday, I’ll join them on the television at 3 eastern – the times they’re repeated are at the links.  I’ll be talking mostly about Adventures in Assisiof course, but also about my other books on saints, since it’s that time of year.

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— 1 —

…….in case you missed it…

Ann Engelhart did an interview with the Brooklyn Diocese television network – it’s a great introduction to the book, with a peak into her studio.

— 2 —

Jan Hooks died! Sad!

Some of you might remember Jan from SNL or Designing Women or Third Rock from the Sun   As for me and mine, I remember her from way back, even before that, back to the earliest days of WTBS.

Those of you who care or pay attention know that WTBS out of Atlanta was Ted Turner’s first station, the origins of an empire which led to TNT, Cartoon Network, Turner Classic Movies…etc.

But before any of that was WTCG – channel 17 –  an independent station that showed reruns, the Atlanta Braves and featured one Bill Tush as new anchor and entertainment impresario.

I am not sure how – I’m assuming the earliest stages of cable – WTCG reached our house in Knoxville.  When I was in high school, Bill Tush had a very strange, wild, late night news show.

A couple of years after that, he had a sketch comedy show called, appropriately, “Tush,” featuring a merry band of comedic actors and writers, including Ed and Bonnie Turner, and …Jan Hooks.


— 3 —

When the news came across the wire (okay..Twitter) today than Jan Hooks had passed away, I was shocked, not only that she had died, but that the headlines reported that she was 57 years old.  Wait, what? I’m 54.  No way she was only 3 years older than I am….I mean…wasn’t I a teenager when I became a fan, and didn’t I at the time peg her has about ten years older?

I don’t know. I guess I got confused, thinking that “Tush” was what I’d watched in high school…but no. It must have been just Bill Tush’s crazy late-night news antics then. “Tush” was a few years later and now, re watching what’s available – sad YouTube renditions – geez, you’d think that someone would get us a decent set – I can see how young she was.

Rest in peace.  What a talent.

(The oddest thing about revisiting these Tush sketches today was how familiar they were.  I must have VCR’d them back in the day because today, 30+ years later, I could almost recite some of them…)

— 4 —

Michael and I took a field trip this week on our only available day – Wednesday.  We (I) drove about an hour to Oneonta, to Palisades Park, which provided us with a decent little woodsy hike and some views, and then to a couple of covered bridges.  Blount County, Alabama boasts of three covered bridges.  We’d been to one a couple of years ago, so today, we crossed off the other two  One was small and nothing to brage about, but the other – Horton Mill Bridge – was quite impressive.

"amy welborn"

"amy welborn"

"amy welborn"

— 5 —

It’s the highest covered bridge in the United States – 70+ feet above the waters of the Warrior River.

What was even more impressive was the approach.  I drove north of Oneonata on 231….putter, putter…and saw the sign.  It pointed left and said, “covered bridge.”  I turned, expecting to drive a bit more before I hit it. Nope!  It was RIGHT THERE!  Still in use, not two hundred feet from the state highway.  Well.

— 6 —

Michael and I attended a short presentation on a cultural/historical matter at a local cultural institution this week.  In the midst of the very mediocre presentation, the presenter referred to Michael and said, “I know you must be bored…”

…when in fact, what I’m sure he was thinking, “I’m nine and I know more about this than you do lady, so yeah, maybe I AM bored..”

— 7 —

Oh, people, I was a Junior Brown fan long before this.

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