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Posts Tagged ‘Amy Welborn’

For today’s feast, Pope Emeritus Benedict, from 2012:

But now we may ask ourselves: What does it mean that Mary is Queen? Is it merely a title along with others, the crown, an ornament like others? What does it mean? What is this queenship? As already noted, it is a consequence of her being united with her Son, of her being in heaven, i.e. in communion with God. She participates in God’s responsibilities over the world and in God’s love for the world. There is the commonly held idea that a king or queen should be person with power and riches. But this is not the kind of royalty proper to Jesus and Mary. Let us think of the Lord: The Lordship and Kingship of Christ is interwoven with humility, service and love: it is, above all else, to serve, to assist, to love. Let us recall that Jesus was proclaimed king on the Cross, with this inscription written by Pilate: “King of the Jews” (cf. Mark 15:26). In that moment on the Cross it is revealed that He is king. And how is he king? By suffering with us, for us, by loving us to the end; it is in this way that he governs and creates truth, love and justice. Or let us also think of another moment: at the Last Supper, he bends down to wash the feet of his disciples. Therefore, the kingship of Jesus has nothing to do with that which belongs to the powerful of the earth. He is a king who serves his servants; he showed this throughout his life. And the same is true for Mary. She is queen in God’s service to humanity. She is the queen of love, who lives out her gift of self to God in order to enter into His plan of salvation for man. To the angel she responds: Behold the handmaid of the Lord (cf. Luke 1:38), and in the Magnificat she sings: God has looked upon the lowliness of His handmaid (cf. Luke 1:48). She helps us. She is queen precisely by loving us, by helping us in every one of our needs; she is our sister, a humble handmaid.

 

Thus we have arrived at the point: How does Mary exercise this queenship of service and love? By watching over us, her children: the children who turn to her in prayer, to thank her and to ask her maternal protection and her heavenly help, perhaps after having lost their way, or weighed down by suffering and anguish on account of the sad and troubled events of life. In times of serenity or in the darkness of life we turn to Mary, entrusting ourselves to her continual intercession, so that from her Son we may obtain every grace and mercy necessary for our pilgrimage along the paths of the world. To Him who rules the world and holds the destinies of the universe in His hands we turn with confidence, through the Virgin Mary. For centuries she has been invoked as the Queen of heaven; eight times, after the prayer of the holy Rosary, she is implored in the Litany of Loreto as Queen of the Angels, Patriarchs, Prophets, Apostles, Martyrs, Confessors, Virgins, of all Saints and of Families. The rhythm of this ancient invocation, and daily prayers such as the Salve Regina, help us to understand that the Holy Virgin, as our Mother next to her Son Jesus in the glory of Heaven, is always with us, in the daily unfolding of our lives.

 

The title of Queen is therefore a title of trust, of joy and of love. And we know that what she holds in her hands for the fate of the world is good; she loves us, and she helps us in our difficulties.

 

Related:

Praying the Rosary – the small devotional book I had a hand in. 

Free e-book on Mary? Got it right here: Mary and the Christian Life

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GUYS!

Adventures in Assisi has dropped!  

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A month before the previously announced publication date, the newest book from me and Ann Engelhart is available for order. I was hoping to do a big post on it this week, with quirky photos of my stash of the books, but….

I don’t have any.  Yet.  There was a delivery glitch, so I haven’t even seen the published book yet.   Hopefully I’ll have them tomorrow, and then I’ll talk a lot about this book, which is much different from any St. Francis-for-Kids book out there. 

(We have also, in the last month, come to an informal agreement on another book – #5 for us!)

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School’s going just fine…for everyone.  

The 8th grader is getting along famously, takes his homework in stride, and is enjoying his Days Spent With People Not Related To Him. 

It’s weird doing school at home with only one, though.  It’s almost too easy.  Maybe I should add calculus and make it harder.

Or not.

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Feeding an ant to the Venus Flytrap

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Speaking of math, I’m going to bore you one more time by talking up Beast Academy.  I know, you go to the website and you see comic books and you think, how challenging can that be?  

Well, plenty – you have to do both the guide and the workbook, and when you do…it’s impressive.  I’m continually amazed by the pedagogy of this series.  I think I would describe it as sneakily challenging.  The workbook pages start off with simple treatment of the matter at hand, but within a few problems have led the student to a crazily higher level of thinking.   This series and its parent, the amazing Art of Problem Solving embraces a pedagogy centered on the value of a student sitting and stewing over a problem in a fruitful way.  I would show you the pages Michael did today on angles, but I wouldn’t want to violate copyright.  Let’s just say that in a matter of ten problems, he went from simply measuring angles with a protractor to being challenged to deduce the measurements of angles without a protractor and without being given step-by-step guidance on how to do it.  

So instead of that, I’ll just point you to the material they have on their site, including these pages from the 1st 4th grade book on triangles.

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We’ve started doing some logic, and for writing/spelling and so on, we’re going to – among other things – use the Brave Writer method again.  He’ll be doing copywork and analysis of books for which BW provides issues of “The Arrow” – see here for more about that.  The first, in keeping with our recent trip to NYC, is The Cricket in Times Square.

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This week…music lessons began, an art lesson,.another trip to the botanical gardens, picking up where our previous visit – cut short by a hurting leg – left off.  A trip to the Birmingham Museum of Art.

(If you ever come this way, please know that both the Botanical Gardens and the Museum of Art charge no admission and are both quite fine.) 

Also, a couple of library trips.  Of course. 

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Sketching at the museum, math at the library.

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Last weekend:

At the beach for about 24 hours….wish it could have been longer….

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Today, we caught a school presentation/performance related to an event called Earfilms, presented over the last few days at UAB.  (University of Alabama at Birmingham).  Earfilms is an aural experience in which audience members are blindfolded and listen to a mesh of live narration and recorded sound relayed in a “3d” manner – surroundsound, if you will.  The school sessions weren’t the complete performance (which is almost 90 minutes) and we were disappointed there were no blindfolds (we were just asked to close our eyes), but we did get an interesting exposure to different understandings of music and sound from members of the UAB faculty and the artists involved in Earfilms, the latter of whom were British and one of whom wore a cool hat, so there’s that:

Earfilms

After the performance, in an interactive area with one of the artists, speaking into a 3D microphone, whatever that is.

Super busy weekend with two pool parties, a dance and a sleepover. Because socialization.

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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For a long time, I’ve been searching for a really absorbing, can’t-put-it-down read, and several months ago, I finally found it, back in the 19th century:

No Name by Wilkie Collins.

I’d never read any Collins before, not even The Moonstone. I don’t remember the rabbit hole excursion that took me to this one, but the Amazon reviews were intriguing, so I splurged, spent $0.00, and was then occupied for weeks. 

I’m not sure how thick this book would be in dead tree edition, but it was long, and tedious only briefly, here and there. So I suppose since “brief” and “tedious” are antonyms..it wasn’t tedious at all?

For the most part, it was fascinating and quite absorbing, often contemporary in feel and entertaining.

"wilkie Collins"It’s also an interesting social commentary on social class, morays, inheritance laws, marriage and gender relations in 19th century England. 

In brief, No Name is the story of two young adult sisters whose parents die within days of each other, and because of a convoluted family situation only revealed at their deaths, lose what they thought would be their inheritance.  The story follows both sisters, in a way, although the center is really the younger sister, Magdalen, who goes to bizarre lengths to reclaim what she believes is rightfully hers, lengths which include a stint on the stage, many deceptions of various degrees, and interaction with a host of great characters, and of course, a few coincidences along the way. 

There are some fantastic characters in this book, figures that upon first introduction may seem sterotypical, but which acquire depth and verisimilitude along the way (with all those words describing them…they’d better…).  There is a bit of melodrama and moralism in the conclusion, but it’s really just a touch, and is almost earned.  

One of the most interesting elements of this book to me were chapters, interspersed between major sections, composed of only exchanges of letters or newspaper reports.  It’s a brisk, efficient way of moving the story along.  

Here is a good synopsis and discussion of the book at Book Snob. 

Next up:  Armandale. 

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For today:

The Feast of the Assumption is a day of joy. God has won. Love has won. It has won life. Love has shown that it is stronger than death, that God possesses the true strength and that his strength is goodness and love.

Mary was taken up body and soul into Heaven: there is even room in God for the body. Heaven is no longer a very remote sphere unknown to us.   (Source)

But there is also another aspect: in God not only is there room for man; in man there is room for God. This too we see in Mary, the Holy Ark who bears the presence of God. In us there is space for God and this presence of God in us, so important for bringing light to the world with all its sadness, with its problems. This presence is realized in the faith: in the faith we open the doors of our existence so that God may enter us, so that God can be the power that gives life and a path to our existence. In us there is room, let us open ourselves like Mary opened herself, saying: “Let your will be done, I am the servant of the Lord”. By opening ourselves to God, we lose nothing. On the contrary, our life becomes rich and great.

And so, faith and hope and love are combined. Today there is much discussion on a better world to be awaited: it would be our hope. If and when this better world comes, we do not know, I do not know. What is certain is that a world which distances itself from God does not become better but worse. Only God’s presence can guarantee a good world. Let us leave it at that.

One thing, one hope is certain: God expects us, waits for us, we do not go out into a void, we are expected. God is expecting us and on going to that other world we find the goodness of the Mother, we find our loved ones, we find eternal Love. God is waiting for us: this is our great joy and the great hope that is born from this Feast. (Source)

By looking at Mary’s Assumption into Heaven we understand better that even though our daily life may be marked by trials and difficulties, it flows like a river to the divine ocean, to the fullness of joy and peace. We understand that our death is not the end but rather the entrance into life that knows no death. Our setting on the horizon of this world is our rising at the dawn of the new world, the dawn of the eternal day.

“Mary, while you accompany us in the toil of our daily living and dying, keep us constantly oriented to the true homeland of bliss. Help us to do as you did”.

Dear brothers and sisters, dear friends who are taking part in this celebration this morning, let us pray this prayer to Mary together. In the face of the sad spectacle of all the false joy and at the same time of all the anguished suffering which is spreading through the world, we must learn from her to become ourselves signs of hope and comfort; we must proclaim with our own lives Christ’s Resurrection.

“Help us, Mother, bright Gate of Heaven, Mother of Mercy, source through whom came Jesus Christ, our life and our joy. Amen”. (Source)

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Would you like an exercise podcast update?  Of course you would.

This program (scroll down to 8/8) on the destruction of English religious art during the Reformation was really excellent. Presented by historian Diarmaid MacCulloch.

Great Lives has an interesting framework:  a well-known person in a certain field discusses a chosen “great life” along with a host and a scholar.

This week, I listened to a program (4/1) on cellist Jacqueline Du Pre (perhaps you saw the film Hilary and Jackie? I did..a couple of times, and loved it, even though it’s apparently – like most biopics – completely inaccurate.) The well-known person was another intriguing person – deaf solo percussionist Evelyn Glennie. Great! More rabbit holes!

I also listened to Michael Palin talk about Hemingway – Palin did one of his travel programs on Hemingway some years ago.  Enjoyed this one, too.  Both gave me a lot to think about regarding creativity and the self.

 

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Actually started and finished a couple of books.  The Confessions of Frances Godwin which, well, I gave two stars to. Sorry.  Next was non-fiction: How Paris Became Paris, which was interesting because of the very mild myth-busting that was going on.  People like to credit/blame Haussmann for moving Paris from medievalism to modernity, but as the author of this book shows, the transformation began centuries before, mostly under King Henry IV who oversaw the construction of revolutionary public spaces like the Pont Neuf and the Place Royale.  Reading texts from 17th century travel guides was illuminating, but the book was a bit overstuffed and the content could have fit in in a meaty Atlantic or New Yorker article.

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Speaking of reading and public spaces – I tweeted this last week, but forgot to mention it here.  Our local alt weekly, called Weld ran an excellent, thorough treatment of the murder of Father James Coyle on the steps of the Cathedral rectory almost a hundred years ago.  If you’ve never heard of this case – go read the article.  It’s an important part of our history, featuring anti-Catholicism, the Klan and future Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black.

Coyle could not have imagined that his most imminent threat was from a fellow clergyman. Edwin Stephenson was an ordained Methodist deacon who presented himself as a full-fledged minister for his primary occupation of marrying couples at the Jefferson County Courthouse (which in 1921 was on the same Third Avenue North block as St. Paul’s). He was also a member of Robert E. Lee Klavern No. 1, the first Alabama chapter of the new Ku Klux Klan.

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Back to the Assumption – as I mentioned yesterday, don’t forget that my book Mary and the Christian Life is available for a free download.  Not for a limited time, either.  Today and probably always!

— 6 —

I know I mentioned that I sold my other house, but even now, the relief hasn’t worn off.  Once a day, I pause, and think, “Aaaaah!” – amazed at the freedom and resolved that this – the house I’m in – will be the last home I own.  No, I don’t plan on living here until I die (unless I die in the next ten years), but really and truly – when we’re done here, I’m done owning, and will be perfectly fine with renting.  It’s not ownership that gets me – it’s the burden of knowing you are going to have to sell the thing someday, and all that entails.  Plus (again, I hope we are talking far into the future), after dealing with my father’s estate, I’m determined to leave my own children with as few complications as possible, and that includes a house that has to be sold.  What we leave behind is a continual object of meditation for me.  It’s a metaphor, you know.

— 7 —

Rectify is tearing me up,but I won’t write about it until next week – the final episode.  Except to say that in a program filled with fine actors and juicy roles, Clayne Crawford as Ted, Jr is really emerging as a standout.  If you live in the South, you know Ted, Jr – the good ol’ boy/prep/poseur – he’s instantly recognizable…but then as the show has progressed, he’s become recognizable in a different way – as a confused, angry, self-doubting guy who really doesn’t know what’s hit him or his family.   So imagine my amazement just five minutes ago when I looked him to find you a good link and discovered that he’s from these parts – not that far from Birmingham.

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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The Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary is, of course, tomorrow, August 15.  

I have a few Mary-related resources – one free – that you might be interested in. 

First, is my book Mary and the Christian Life, published by Word Among Us Press, but now out of print.  I have a pdf copy of the book available for free download at this page.

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It’s a .pdf file.  You can also read it at Scribd, here. 

(Also available at Scribd are my book Come Meet Jesus, about Pope Benedict XVI, and Michael’s The Power of the Cross.) 

There’s also a rosary book – a small, hardbound volume on Praying the Rosary, published by OSV.  

You can read an excerpt here:

As we pray the Rosary, then, we join with Mary in contemplating Christ. With her, we remember Christ, we proclaim Him, we learn from Him, and, most importantly, as we raise our voices in prayer and our hearts in contemplation of the holy mysteries, this “compendium of the Gospel” itself, we are conformed to Him.

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We’ve arrived at the point in our household at which if no older siblings are available, I let the boys (who are ages almost 10 and 13) go to the movies by themselves.   It will not surprise you to know that I obsessively research a movie before they’re allowed to see it, so I feel very comfortable about it.  I’m around during the showing, just down the mall row at Barnes and Noble, and I get back to the theater well before the movie ends. This doesn’t happen very often since most movies are awful, but rarely, it does.

That’s a preamble to telling you about last night.  They’ve been wanting to see Guardians of the Galaxy, and considering the raves I’ve been reading, I wasn’t against it.  It was quite rainy here last night, so it seemed like a good time to take in a flick.  I was going to let them go by themselves, but do you know what?  Something nagged inside, telling me…not this time.   It’s not that I wanted to go.   I have no truck with comic book/superhero movies – they bore the heck out of me, no matter how psychologically deep they attempt to be.  In fact, the more attempted psychological depth, the duller it is.   But, you know, popcorn.  And that nagging sense.

And boy am I glad I did.  First of all, I’m glad I can, you know, enter knowledgeably into this cultural conversation.  Secondly, I would hate to have had my boys sit through the opening scene of this movie without me.

Because do you know how the adventurous hijinks begin?  Cold open – no credits, just a date (1988):  With a kid watching his mother die.

Okay, so it’s essential to the arc.  No problem.  That’s real.  But I was just…surprised.  And glad I listened to the voice that gently insisted I be there with the boys. And if you are taking younger children, you might what to know that.  The movie starts with a young boy watching his mother die and shrinking back from her outreached hand.

But. There are other problems with this movie that hardly anyone is mentioning.  There’s a surprising amount of vulgarity.  Several “sh**” – includiIng one at a climactic – what I would call “quotable” moment.  I don’t mind it so much, in small doses, in offhand ways, but at moments like this, when a character is making a big speech and the vulgarity is part of what might be a catch phrase..not so much.

There’s an extended riff on to what extent someone is a “dick.”  Really.  At one point, a character goes, “What the …” and you know the rest – how his teeth reach out to the lower lip for the beginning of the “f” sound.  I really have to wonder…what kind of idiots who are also adults sit around and think, “HARDY HAR HAR…LET’S HAVE THE GUY ALMOST  SAY F***!”  HILARIOUS!”

Wut?

I’m no prude.  I say all those words in real life (not in front of the kids, though).  Well, maybe not “dick” because why?  But I’m not keen on them being used in movies marketed to kids.

Nor am I keen on the exhausting violence.  Yes, it’s cartoonish, in a way.  But it really is deadening, exhausting and stupid in the end – this constant assault of CGI creatures screaming, rolling, blasting and slicing each other, mostly for the sake of the 3D version.  (Felt the same way about Hobbit 2 – it was an assault.  Not just of the two parties on screen on each other, but on me. An assault, I tell you!  Relentless and deadening.)

And, yes, oh, it had a point.  There was a bit of self-sacrifice at two junctures, which was good and even a bit moving to behold, but other than that?

Really?  You got into the late 70’s and 80’s soundtrack?  As if you didn’t grasp the direct appeal to the demographic that is in its late 30’s and might have early tween kids?

Sorry for the dissent, bu  once again, I’m left marveling at the resources – millions of dollars and human creative energies – spent on something that was really not great, was obviously exploitative in the way most contemporary entertainment is  and that a day later, my kids aren’t quoting or referencing at all….it came, it brawled, it cussed, it moved on….

 

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We’re back. House intact, snake alive.

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BIG is a creepy movie, and he’s never seen it, but he did know about the big piano at FAO Schwarz, so here we are.

 

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We did almost everything I wanted to do with them.  They’d been to New York City before, but had little memory of it.  It was hot, but not unbearably so. It was crowded, but once you were away from Midtown, Times Square and Fifth Avenue, it was a lot better.

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St. Patrick’s from the top of Rockefeller Center – a nice view of the cruciform shape.

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It’s expensive, though, I’ll tell you that – as if you needed to know, as if I needed a reminder.  Really, if you want to do a biggish city with lots of culture with kids and not spend so much money, and you don’t have relatives or friends to crash with in the area, Washington DC – where almost all the museums are free – is the way to go. (Also Chicago if you have local museum memberships – our McWane membership got us into both the Field and the Museum of Technology and Industry – FREE.)

Even attempts to save money here can be problematic.  We spent a big chunk of Wednesday in the American Natural History Museum – they surprised us by having an extensive and good ancient Americas collection, so yes, we spent more time than we thought there – and we went in and out a couple of times (btw, at no time did anyone look carefully or scan our tickets….).  The ticket line was horrendous – every time – first thing in the morning, when we left for lunch, and when we left for good around 3 – probably a hundred people on both sides – but I had just walked up to a kiosk and purchased ours, no wait.  I’m sure the lines were all about redeeming passes of one sort or another…too bad people have to spend part of their short time in New York waiting in lines like that….

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My pre-Columbian scholar LOVED this section.

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Food?  Well, nothing super memorable.  Shake Shack met with approval (especially by me when I discovered they serve alcohol), the arancini we snacked on in Little Italy were very good – unfortunately the way we ended up spending that day took us away from Chinatown before I could find the hand-pulled noodles I’d been hoping to get.   Excellent pizza at this by-the-slice place.  Good sandwiches from a deli behind the Natural History Museum, eaten in Roosevelt park.

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No fine dining for us, but they weren’t too hungry that often.

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— 5 —

Favorite things?  I think Governor’s Island, the Brooklyn Bridge and Central Park (where we wandered – saw wildlife – Look!  It’s a RAT!” – did the rowboats and the remote control sailboats) and the Tenement Museum would top the list for all of us.

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Down on the South Street Seaport, looking at Brooklyn.

 

Every counter person, sales person, museum attendant, bike rental person we encountered was very friendly and helpful.  The only rudeness was from a taxi driver who heard where I wanted to go (longish story) and scoffed.   Someone told me later not to tell them where you are going until you actually sit in the cab – then by law they have to take you.  (All’s well than ends well – the subway station was closer than I’d thought….)

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We did see Newsies which they enjoyed but which was ultimately meh because it was, of course, the usual homogenized, musically pedestrian Disney stuff.  I couldn’t help be amused by the irony of a Disney show having as a central theme the exploitive greed of a business – as we sat in a theater where the full-priced tickets  went for $300 for a little more than 2 hours of entertainment.

(I got ours at the TKTS booth down at the South Street Seaport – decent discount.)

(On their last visit, we went to see The Thirty Nine Steps which was so inventive and delightful and held their interest, even though they were four years younger than they are now – in a more deeply engaged way than the in-your-face eardrum busting hoofing of Newsies.)

The dancing was great, the vibe was a good one for the boys, but all I can say is that last night when I got home, I watched, for the zillionth time, the opening number from On The Town…no comparison, as if anyone would expect there to be.

(BTW – a revival is coming! )


 

 

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We went to the World Trade Center Memorial – not the museum, but the striking,  huge downward-flowing fountains constructed on and in the foundations of both buildings, both surrounded by walls in which have been etched the names of those who died there.  I found it so very moving and quite fitting.  They are fountains, rather than the cool stillness of stone, and so they powerfully convey a subtle message of hope and life.

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No, we did not take selfies at the WTC memorial.

 

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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….is the best.

A few weeks ago, I got the “wandering around NYC by myself” thing out of my system, so now I’m back with the crew, and the first day was one of our ideal travel days – doing things that I probably wouldn’t have done if I were by myself or just with other adults..and as a result, saw so much more and at a wonderful, (mostly) leisurely pace.

Our first day would be Brooklyn.

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We walked over the Brooklyn Bridge, spent time in Brooklyn Bridge Park, rode the ferry to Governor’s Island, then returned for some walking around Brooklyn Heights and finally, dinner at Shake Shack.

 

 

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Watching coconuts being hacked for consumption at Smorgasburg

 

 

 

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At Brooklyn Bridge Park

 

They played at parks for a long time, alongside and with kids from all over the world and all backgrounds.  Many, many Orthodox Jewish families, in some of which the children were all dressed in almost identical clothes, as you can sort of see here:

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At Governor’s Island

 

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GREAT bike ride on the fabulous Governor’s Island.

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These will be super quick and probably super non-informative.  But here we are.

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Another quick trip to Charleston, to give family members a hand during a move.  Because of the babysitting involved as well as rain all day Thursday we unfortunately didn’t make it to the beach.  But we did revisit the aquarium and Shem Creek Park.  Oh, and  walked around the Citadel, a walk during which I thought of two things:

1) House of Cards.

2) My previous visit there – I spoke at the chapel back in DVC days. Mike took Joseph to a baseball game  during my talk and reported afterwards that Darius Rucker had sung the national anthem and we thought funny things like that would happen forever.

Weird and  a bit sad -and I think f*** it and thank you and oh well and everybody dies and help me do this well and even better and someday  and it  just is what it is.

Michael caught (briefly) a toad and a small snake.   Not at the Citadel but at other places. In one of our downtown wanderings, I discovered that downtown Charleston now has a Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream shop - when I want to make ice cream, but don’t feel like doing a custard base, I fall back on Jeni’s recipe (egg free), which is very good.  The shop is GREAT, with an emphasis on very grown up flavors, which I really enjoy.

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It used to be that after time away, I spent the last five minutes of the approach home wondering/worrying whether or not my house had been broken into while I was away. Now I spend the last five minutes wondering whether my house has been broken into and if the snake is still alive.

(Answer from tonight: house safe, snake still alive. And had shed while we were gone, which is what I thought was going on the last few days before we left when he wouldn’t come out of his little cave….)

— 4 —

Life with my 9-year old:

This child on the drive home, randomly, at random times:

1. “Jiro dreams of sush! Jiro dreams of sushi!” Followed by numerous quotes from the movie, which he and I had watched some months ago.  I mean…months.

2. “Mom, what’s the place where they study to be priests?”
“A seminary.”
“Right. And what’s the seminary we visited in Chicago?”
“Mundelein.” (this was in March, btw)
“Do you remember the young guy who was there, the guy with black hair who was like in his twenties?”
“Brandon?”
(Brandon Vogt, of course)
“Yeah, him! Well, I wish I had his voice.”

And I have no idea why he finds Brandon’s voice so…estimable!

So…that’s life in the car with this kid. Never a dull trip.

— 5 —

Including breakfast at Denny’s, studying up on his Mayan.

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Do you think I’m kidding when I’m saying that I’m researching “Learn Mayan” books for him for this “school year”?

Not kidding.

UNSCHOOLING, BABY!

— 6 —

Here is me with my BBC radio podcast recommendations.  This week, it’s this:  “Educating Isaac.”  As a person interested in both education and music, I found this program quite fascinating and even moving.  The presenter is a pianist and music scholar who takes on the current dominant paradigm of music training, which is essentially about being able to duplicate and imitate.  He wonders if there is another way and finds it in the 17th and 18th century Naples conservatories.

And here is where your (okay, my) Catholic and historiographical interests kick in.  For part of what the presenter takes on is the paradigm of music history that highlights the mostly German tradition while completely ignoring the Catholic Italian tradition of music education, formation and composition which, he says, was even understood at the time as being superior.  Today we think of the “conservatory” as being a facility for training musicians, but in actuality the term is rooted in institutions that, yes, were about music training, but that were started and run by the Church as a means of “conserving” the lives of orphans and other very poor children via music.

I’m telling you – listen to this program. 

— 7 —

One Last Travel Blast coming this week – my older at-home kid is going back to school (for positive reasons, but still…school…forms..papers…uniforms..blah…) so our days of free n’ easy travel are about to come to an end …for at least the next nine months.  So stay tuned here and on Instagram to keep up with this last trip….

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— 1 —

A couple of field trips this week -one documented here – to Moundville.  The other, yesterday, was to Horse Pens 40, just about 40 minutes away.  It’s a privately-held park, campground and event space high atop a mountain.  The great attraction is an excellent boulder field (others around here that we’ve enjoyed have been at Moss Creek Preserve and Cherokee Rock Village.) These formations have made the place a favored refuge for various groups and communities over the centuries.  The name?

 

    A young couple named John and Hattie Hyatt finally settled on this land during the late 1800’s. The story is that he came from Georgia with his ‘stolen wife’ (whatever that meant), a horse, and all his earthly possessions in a flour sack. Looking for a place of refuge, the Horse Pens was a natural choice. Years later, he filed on the property, referring to it as “the home 40, the farming 40, and the horse pens 40, each tract containing 40 acres of land”. This is how Horse Pens 40 got its name. This is one of the last homesteads filed in the state of Alabama. The land patent and original title was actually signed by the President of the United States. (Actually, the signatures of two U.S. presidents turned up on documents pertaining to the property during the title search)

No one around here actually “boulders” – yet.  But who knows…

— 2 —

Movies watched over the past week: The Road to Morocco, The Road to Utopia and The Man Who Knew Too Much.  (Remake of the latter – which Hitchcock himself said was better than the first version)

It had been years since I’d seen any of the Road movies, so I did (of course) research to see what The Internet told me would be the best to start with.  The general conclusion seemed to be that Morocco was best, followed closely by Utopia.  Well, I think Utopia was far better than the other – the premise wasn’t quite as lame, Hope and Crosby’s enjoyment of each other’s company is palpable and fun, and I thought the jokes were much sharper, although I had to pause the movie several times to explain 60-year old pop culture references, and that final visual joke, while hysterical and perfect, is…awkward.

The boys were totally absorbed by The Man Who Knew Too Much, perhaps in part because it involved a little boy in peril.  As for me, I was absolutely impressed by Doris Day’s performance – it’s very strong and warm – and that scene where she sits at the piano and starts belting out Que Sera Sera at the top of her lungs so her little boy, imprisoned somewhere in the embassy, would hear her…gosh, my contacts are bothering me. Give me a minute, will you?

— 3 —

A couple of excellent reads on education:

First, a match made in heaven: Andrew Ferguson writing about Common Core:

It has to do with the old rule that supply creates its own demand. Over the last two generations, as the problem became unignorable and as vast freshets of money poured from governments and nonprofit foundations, an army of experts emerged to fix America’s schools. From trade unions and think tanks they came, from graduate schools of education and nonprofit foundations, from state education departments and for-profit corporations, from legislative offices and university psych labs and model schools and experimental classrooms, trailing spreadsheets and PowerPoints and grant proposals; they found work as lobbyists, statisticians, developmental psychologists, neurological researchers, education theorists, entrepreneurs, administrators, marketers, think tank fellows, textbook writers—even teachers! So great a mass of specialists cannot be kept idle. If they find themselves with nothing to do, they will find something to do. 

From The New Republic, “Don’t Send Your Kid to the Ivy League.”   Even if that’s not an option or choice for you, the article is well worth a read as it dissects the thankless, soul-sucking and time-gobbling hamster wheel that high school and college have become for would be “high achievers” everywhere.

 

— 4 —

I usually find several podcasts from BBC radio worth listening to in the course of a week (although, tragically, In Our Time is on its summer hiatus until September…), and exceptional this week were:

Food Programme episode on food and opera.  It was less than thirty minutes long, but boy, did it pack a punch, employing the gifts of Fred Plotkin, opera-and-food-and-Italy writer.  I loved it.

Also the program on World War I: Cradle of Jazz might seem to waste our time, focusing on such a topic instead of the more serious aspects of World War I, but of course there is plenty of attention being given to the more fundamental aspects and will be over the next four years.  This program was actually quite absorbing, detailing the development of early jazz, the impact of the war and the   work of mostly African-American jazz musicians in Europe before and right after the War.

 

— 5 —

Today I thought we might go to Tuskegee, to the Tuskegee Airmen Museum and the George Washington Carver Museum, but then I realized it was 2 hours away and I was sort of done with driving around Alabama for the week, so after I finished writing my Living Faith Lent devotion assignment that was due today, we moseyed out to the new big Latino-food centered supermarket called Mi Pueblo.  It’s enormous – as large as or larger than the Publix down the street.  According to the linked article, it’s the largest Hispanic grocery store in Alabama, the second in the area (the first is way down in a community south of here called Pelham) and a third is planned.  It’s a great store.  A huge variety of foods, quite inexpensive produce, amazing meat counter(including goat, pig and cow heads if you like), in-house tortilleria, a counter offering fruit concoctions, a bakery and a restaurant, where we ate a great lunch from the buffet.  None of the meats on the buffet were labeled, so that was probably a good thing – they ate pretty bravely in Mexico, but still they weren’t given pause by the possibility of eating goat or pig cheeks.  It’s not near my house, but it is on the route for some activities, so it will definitely become a regular stop.

"amy welborn"

 

"amy welborn"

"amy welborn"

 

"amy welborn"

 

 

 

 

And then the rest of the afternoon at the pool, which I realized we hadn’t been to in a while, not only because of travels but because one of the boys had a bout of swimmer’s ear about a month ago – the first any of my kids have ever had.

— 6 —

Oh, I finally sold – as in closed and signed off on – the other house.  I was sad to see the bungalow go, even though I haven’t lived in it for a year and  I really love my not-quite-mod but still mid century place, its yard, and on behalf of the boys, the basketball goal.  Someday, I’ll live the Bungalow Life again.  Just not now.

— 7 —

Just a few more weeks and Adventures in Assisi will be published – look for more on that soon!

 

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