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Posts Tagged ‘7 Quick Takes’

— 1 —

Mass last Sunday was a cappella. The organ had to be covered with a ginormous tarp because of plaster work being done in the loft.

I have to say, it was lovely.  It really is my preference, no offense to all the musicians out there.  A chanted monastic liturgy, Eastern Christian liturgies resonating with the human voice…yes.  Seems to me it’s the way it should be.

At one point, I presented the worship aid, with the words of the Gloria, in Latin, closer to my 9-year old’s face.  He waved it away and whispered, “We had to learn it in schola.” 

Well. My bad.

— 2 —

Speaking of music in our cathedral, this past Monday the cathedral hosted the debut performance of a new (independent) music group in town, the Highland Consort, specializing in Renaissance Polyphony. It was a stunning performance.  We sat in the rear of the main center aisles, which were full, it seemed to me.

As I sat there, I listened and I also watched people listening. And I thought, “This is evangelization.
Because why? Because there  during that hour you have a few hundred people sitting in a Catholic church listening to Catholic sacred music (the program had all the lyrics in Latin and English – easily understood), and you could see people, as the music flowed over them, letting their gaze wander around the church. They watched the ensemble, but that’s not all they saw.  Their heads turned, their necks craned as they looked around at the saints in the stained glass, up at the ceiling painting, over at the paintings of the sacramental symbols in the sanctuary, at the altar, the statues of Mary, Joseph, St. John Vianney and St. Paul…there were not only in a church, but they were in the midst of the Church, surrounded by a cloud of witnesses, some silent, some beautifully audible, past and present, transcending time and space, surrounded by the proclamation of the Good News in visual art, music, symbol, structure and hospitality, and guess what….all were welcome.

— 3 —

Speaking of stained glass, our weekly jaunt took Michael and me up to Huntsville.  I wanted to revisit the science center that we frequented last fall when the older boy was doing First Lego League. It’s moved and I wanted to check out the facilities…we were disappointed to see that it really wasn’t an improvement and everything looked, in fact, a little more tired.

So after a very short visit, we headed over to Lowe Mill, an old mill (obviously) that has been transformed into studio space for artists.  Not a lot of artists were working (I’m guessing more of them of present on weekends), but we could peek through windows at quite a bit of interesting work.  One fellow who was in was working on this:

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…for a church in Kentucky, and we got a bit of instruction on his technique, which is…painstaking.

— 4 —

I exercise regularly, but I decided this week to revisit the Couch to 5K program which I’d done and finished several years and, it seems, lifetimes ago.  This time I started at week 4, which was no trouble and really just the right spot.  Now,  I didn’t know there were lots of different versions of Cto5k you can download, and the first one I randomly downloaded was…not my style of music.  It was sort of weird.  But then I stumbled upon the versions produced by the ever-helpful NHS, and, well…if you want…entertaining encouragement, I highly recommend giving this version a try.  I mean, what is more helpful than a woman urging  you in a gentle British accent Well done! and Off you go! 

— 5 —

Speaking of British people talking in my ear while I walk and run in circles, Melvin Bragg is back in business with a new season of In Our Time, which I once again, as is my wont, encourage you to try out.  I’ll admit that the first two topics were challenging for me – I couldn’t tell you much more about the number “e” now than before I “listened” to the program, and the next one, on a very important 7th century battle between   Arabs  and  Chinese  lost me after fifteen minutes.  BUT…the third episode was on Rudyard Kipling and it was really good, giving a thorough and fair treatment of his life in India, his business-savvy writing career, his time in America, how he felt about America, World War I, his verse.  Good stuff.

— 6 —

Nothing like waiting until exactly a month before you leave the country to renew your passport.  Good job, me!

— 7 —

Next week, I’ll be spending a lot of time with Jim and Joy Pinto!

Monday, I’ll be on their EWTN radio show, which airs at 2 eastern, and then Thursday, I’ll join them on the television at 3 eastern – the times they’re repeated are at the links.  I’ll be talking mostly about Adventures in Assisiof course, but also about my other books on saints, since it’s that time of year.

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"amy welborn's books"

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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— 1 —

Today (Friday the 17th) is the feastday of St. Ignatius of Antioch.  I hope you’ll take some time to read a bit of the letters of the martyr-bishop who was fed to the beasts in the early 2nd century.   He wrote several, to the communities through which he passed as he was being taken in chains from Antioch to Rome.

The letters center on a few themes:  the unity of the Church, the role of the bishop, the Eucharist, warning against heresies, and, of course, martyrdom. It’s good, vivid, bracing stuff.

I am writing to all the churches to let it be known that I will gladly die for God if only you do not stand in my way. I plead with you: show me no untimely kindness. Let me be food for the wild beasts, for they are my way to God. I am God’s wheat and shall be ground by their teeth so that I may become Christ’s pure bread. Pray to Christ for me that the animals will be the means of making me a sacrificial victim for God.
  No earthly pleasures, no kingdoms of this world can benefit me in any way. I prefer death in Christ Jesus to power over the farthest limits of the earth. He who died in place of us is the one object of my quest. He who rose for our sakes is my one desire.
  The time for my birth is close at hand. Forgive me, my brothers. Do not stand in the way of my birth to real life; do not wish me stillborn. My desire is to belong to God. Do not, then, hand me back to the world. Do not try to tempt me with material things. Let me attain pure light. Only on my arrival there can I be fully a human being. Give me the privilege of imitating the passion of my God. If you have him in your heart, you will understand what I wish. You will sympathise with me because you will know what urges me on.

— 2 —

From Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI’s General Audience talk on Ignatius, several years ago:

Overall, it is possible to grasp in the Letters of Ignatius a sort of constant and fruitful dialectic between two characteristic aspects of Christian life: on the one hand, the hierarchical structure of the Ecclesial Community, and on the other, the fundamental unity that binds all the faithful in Christ.
Consequently, their roles cannot be opposed to one another. On the contrary, the insistence on communion among believers and of believers with their Pastors was constantly reformulated in eloquent images and analogies: the harp, strings, intonation, the concert, the symphony. The special responsibility of Bishops, priests and deacons in building the community is clear.

This applies first of all to their invitation to love and unity. “Be one”, Ignatius wrote to the Magnesians, echoing the prayer of Jesus at the Last Supper: “one supplication, one mind, one hope in love…. Therefore, all run together as into one temple of God, as to one altar, as to one Jesus Christ who came forth from one Father, and is with and has gone to one” (7: 1-2).

— 3 —

The rest of this post will be super short and random.  Sorry about that. Maybe I’ll have more substance next week.

So..this was an interesting article – from the coming Sunday’s NYTimes magazine: it’s about the practice of begging in the predominantly Orthodox Jewish town of Lakewood, New Jersey. 

— 4 —

More New York stuff.  This was an  hilarious article in The New Yorker  by a writer attempting to see how outrageously she could game the “emotional support animal” world. Turtle? Alpaca? Not even kidding.  

— 5 —

Remember, since it’s October, that  means it’s Rosary month.  Perhaps you’d like a free e-book on Mary?

Well…here you go!

And for a not-free book on a saint…don’t forget this one…

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I’ll have a couple of interviews on it over the next couple of weeks – I’ll let you know when they come on.

— 6 —

No field trips this week.  However, this weekend, the older boy is going on a scout thing to Mammoth Cave. Michael and I will be staying around here, but we will be going on a jaunt….fossil hunting!  We are to take hammers, screwdrivers and a box for our finds….this is serious, I guess…..

— 7 —

Synod? Well, sure I have…thoughts.  After it’s over, I’ll jot some of them down.  I mean, honestly, why waste time with pronouncements today when everything is going to change tomorrow…or during the next hour?  Sheesh, what a circus.

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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Two years ago next month, my younger sons and I spent a few days in Assisi.  There’s no way I could have written Adventures in Assisi without that trip.  Here’s a bit more about the journey.

It was part of our massive, sort of crazy three months in Europe the fall of 2012.  Why did we go? Because we could and also because it was a way to force us all into homeschooling.  Pretty dramatic, eh?  I had been knowing that we should be homeschooling for a while, but they were a bit resistant, as was I (mostly for selfish reasons).

As the late winter of 2012 wore on, and I grew more and more dissatisfied with institutional school in general, the notion of a big journey took hold.  My father had passed away the preceding fall, I had the means, I was hitting 52 years old soon…why not?

So we did, and while during the trip, I always told the boys that they could certainly return to school in January…when it came time…they decided…nah. 

(For the record, two years later, my older son, who is 8th grade, is back in school, and it’s going great. The younger son is still home, in 4th grade, and might return to school in 6th…might.)

Anyway. 

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Student protest passing by our apartment in Padua the morning we left for Assisi.

Not to recap the entire journey, but we had landed in Paris on September 11, spent almost 2 months in France – the first chunk in western France and Provence, and then October in Paris.  In early November, we left Paris on the train, spent a couple of days in Lausanne, Switzerland, then about a week in Padua and then finally…Assisi.  

(After Assisi, we were in Rome for 10 days, then…home.)

I really liked Assisi a lot, although it’s a bit of an odd place.

"amy welborn"

It’s your typical Italian hill town, in a way, but not, because it’s spotless to the point of antiseptic.  Ironically, no begging is allowed in Assisi.  For hundreds of years, pilgrimage has been the primary point of Assisi, and it shows – it works like clockwork, everything geared to the pilgrims.

The train station for Assisi is not actually in Assisi – it’s in Maria san Angeli at the bottom of the hill.

We arrived in the evening, caught a taxi and were taken up the hill. And then another. And then another, to our hotel.

I think I read later that the hotel had been a monastery in a previous life, and that explained a lot.  Well, at least it explained the bathroom.

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You would not believe the contortions I had to go through to get this photo, but I was determined.

Obviously not original to the structure, obviously squeezed in.

Yes I was mean, and there was schoolwork done, in the top floor lounge, before we set out on our journeys.

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He’s making an “A” in Algebra in 8th grade now, so I guess we did something right.

Assisi is…hilly.  You get quite a workout there.

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Here’s where Francis was baptized – the Cathedral.

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This is the castle looming above the town.  The best views.

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The church of S. Chiara – this is the church of the Poor Clares, and is where the San Damiano cross is kept now. (no photos inside)

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And this is San Damiano – the way down the hill from the town is lovely, lined with olive groves.  The church which Francis rebuilt, where he experienced the call of Christ in a profound way, and where the Poor Clares first lived and prayed, and where St. Clare died.

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The main piazza in the center of the town – Francis’s birthplace is on this square, hidden behind the tourism office.

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The basilica, where the tomb of Francis is located, and of course, the site of the amazing frescoes by Giotto and others.  A place of profound prayer.

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Playground outside Assisi walls

Then back to Santa Maria degli Angeli, the location of the Porziuncola, the site of one of the early settlements of the friars and the place where St. Francis died. (again, no inside photos allowed – but look up the images – the tiny church in the midst of the big basilica…)

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I think of all the sites, being in that spot where Francis died in the midst of such physical suffering, his brotherhood already in some disarray,and pondering the  tension between humility, poverty of spirit and the majesty of the basilica..was the most thought-provoking.

Last year, I wrote about another encounter I had in Assisi, and its relation to the whole homeschooling thing…..

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— 1 —

I just realized that Living Faith publishes a lot, if not all of their daily devotionals on line.  Had no idea. I don’t know how long they are available, but here are links to some of mine:

March 2013

November 24, 2013

November 26, 2013

June 23, 2014

June 25, 2014

August 27, 2014

September 23, 2014

September 25, 2014

— 2 —

Tomorrow, of course, is the feast of St. Francis of Assisi.  I want to again, highly recommend Fr. Augustine Thompson, OP’s recent biography of the saint.  There is now a more “popular” edition (not that the original, scholarly version was beyond a non-historian’s ability to understand) called Francis of Assisi: The Life.  There’s no dearth of Francis (of Assisi) material out there, but since so many of the contemporary works have a personal agenda – and I don’t mean that in a negative way, but just that a lot of the modern stuff is of the “my engagement with Francis” genre – this biography is important and quite welcome.

In fact, reading this biography was one of the inspirations for Adventures in Assisi. 

— 3 —

...as you can read here in this interview with Ann and me.  Thanks, Lisa Hendey!!!

— 4 —

I’ve been a bit of a slacker on the exercise front this week, but I did get a bit of listening in early on: this series on the global popularity of western Classical music is fascinating.  Really well done exploration of the growing interest in China, India, Turkey and other countries.

— 5 —

The injured finger has healed nicely.  Many have told me that no, a 5-hour emergency room visit for a minor injury is not unusual.  When we went to our pediatrician for the follow-up earlier this week, I asked her about what someone else had told me – that we should have called her and then received an admission to another’s hospital’s specialized children’s clinic nearby.  She shook her head. “Nope,” she said, “because for every, single hand injury, no matter what, they call in a hand specialist, and they only have one.  It’s crazy.  It probably would have been worse.”

Well.  That’s a mercy, anyway.

— 6 —

"amy welborn"

Oh, come on…you know you want more Assisi.

— 7 —

And here’s what homeschooling looked like today:

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School performance of The Wind in the Willows at a local university. I just called up and said, “We homeschool.”  They said, “What cover school?”  I told them.  They said, “Performance is at 10 am. See ya ”  Easy.  The show was, of course, aimed at a slightly younger audience than my almost 10-year old, but live theater is always entertaining, and it beats grammar and logic pages.

Although that was not avoided because he did some in the car. So.

Then an afternoon at Ruffner Mountain.  In thinking about the day, I had anticipated the play being only about an hour, and thought we could work in a jaunt to a spot a little further away…but the play was actually about 90 minutes, so by the time we got to the car, we’d run out of time for that.  So headed to this spot, which is a favorite of his because it has a quarry.  Aside from me listening to him discourse about Star Wars and Lego sets, the primary educational activity was observing how the colors of the soil and rocks on the mountain changed – I had actually never noticed it before, but this time it struck me, and we really paid attention to the shift between browns, greys and almost bright , iron-rich red.

We also got some arts conversation in as he went on a mild rant about something he’d seen in, I think, one of the Star Wars-related cartoons. He said, “Then they cast a spell. That’s not right.  It doesn’t fit what Star Wars is.”  So, hand to God, we started talking about internal consistency of a created universe, suspension of disbelief and so on..and it made sense to him.

Later, after brother had been picked up from school, it was time for art class.  This was super exciting because the technique of the day was clay work – for which he had been yearning ever since he started the classes.

Oh…here’s my favorite tangent of the week.  I think this is a pretty good synopsis of how we roll here:

Last week, in the library run, I pulled this book on the Panama Canal off the shelf.  Earlier this week, I had him read it.  We talked about it.  It led to geography discussions and discussions of presidents among other things.

Then I said, “Have you heard of ‘A man, a plan, a canal, Panama’?”

He said, “Oh, yeah, it was in the book.”

I wrote it on (of course) the white board along with various words like “sis” and “wow” and phrases like “Madam I’m Adam” and asked him to figure out what they all had in common.  It took a while, but the light dawned, and so he learned about Palindromes.

Then I showed him this video, which has nothing to do with palindromes.  I explained who Bob Dylan is. Etc.

(Oooookaaaaay..you’re saying)

Then I showed him this  video – made by an artist he’s gone mad for this late summer and fall.


So….such is the life of the homeschooled kid with the INFP mom….pretty crazy. Yeah.

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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— 1 —

Well….we had a little accident this week.

By “we,” I mean my 9-year old, who, while messing around a cub scout meeting Sunday night, caught his finger in a folding chair.  Minutes before this happened, I had seen him doing that thing – lifting himself up in the chair, folding it up under him – why this was entertaining, I don’t know, but I did shoot him a look and waved a finger at him.  He sat down, but, as I said, minutes later….I looked up again and there was a crowd of adults around his chair..and blood.

The cut was deep and open enough that the nurse-mom who was present recommended a trip to the ER.  If it had not been Sunday night, I would have simply gone to an ambulatory care center, and even without that, in retrospect, I think, with a good bandage, we could have waited until the morning to fix it.

But, in the moment, with what looked like a big, deep, fleshy gash, I thought, “Might as well take care of it now.  How long could it take?”

FIVE HOURS.

— 2 —

So yes, I’ll rant.  There was a physician’s assistant there.  She did the intake. Why she couldn’t have just glued him up right there, I have no idea.  But instead, we had to go back out and wait two hours for an x-ray, then wait an hour for the doctor, and then wait a little bit more for him to get his stuff together (he was very nice) and glue the finger up, instructing us to go see the pediatrician in a week.

For the life of me, I can’t figure out why this process took so long.  I suppose triage was in action, which means that our very minor situation was pushed to the bottom of the list, but there’s something about that that doesn’t make sense, if you have personnel free who can actually take care of the problem as it appears at your door.  It was a busy night.  As far as I could tell, there was one doctor on the floor.  But still….

(We are lucky.  Knock on wood, we hardly every use the medical system. This was the second or third time in my life I’ve been in an ER, between the three off us and not counting check-ups, we average two visits a year to a doctor of one sort or another.  Nothing chronic, no big problems.  These boys are healthy anyway, but I’m sure that not being in school for the past two years has done nothing but help that situation. We’ll see what this winter, with one in close quarters with other kids on all day, will bring.

But anyway.  That’s done and lesson learned.  I talked to people all week who said things like, “Yeah, we had to take Junior in  to another hospital for three stitches on his chin and we were there for five hours,” so this was not unique.  We spent a lot of time watching and listening to a lot of people with serious problems. We had a lot of people to pray for, and a reminder of how fortunate we are in our good health.

I heard the story of Daddy’s collapse at least five times as it was told to visitors and over the phone, and I have to believe that there’s a reason that I was in a position to hear, over and over again, “He always said that if he went while he was in church, he’d count it as a blessing.”

— 3 —

Adventures! In Assisi!

The interviews and such are starting to accumulate.  I was on the Son Rise Morning Show this morning, Ann is welcoming a Very Important Documentary Crew into her home next week (actually..well, not quite.  But there will be cameras and she’ll have a chance to talk about her process, and I’ll let you know when it’s airing and where to see it.) I’ll alert you as more pop up.

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(Check out this lovely blog post with a review of the book!)

— 4 —

Are you following the Bearing Blog family’s trip to Europe? It’s wonderful.  I marvel at her coherence and ability to write so well on the run.

— 5 —

Speaking of travel, today Michael and I took a little field trip.  There are so many wonderful places to go around here, and I’m just sorry that we’re so chained down at the moment.  There are a couple of days during the week we can go places, but we need to be back by 3 for the other kid’s school dismissal.  Weekends are eaten up at this point by scout activities, birthday parties and soon, basketball.

(We did go to Charleston last weekend though – if you follow me on Instagram, you might have picked up on that. Why Charleston, you ask? Because that’s where son, daughter-in-law and (yes) grandson (!) live.  So we try to head over there as frequently as we can. We wish they were closer, but hey, if we have to go somewhere, we’ll take Charleston. )

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Kayaking at Shem Creek Park

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Anyway, the field trip today was to the Natural Bridge of Alabama - the longest one east of the Mississippi – take that, Virginia!

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About an hour away, a very nice, simple outing. Old School tourism.

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In addition to the bridge, lots of caves – not deep caves, more like overhangs.  But that’ll do in a pinch.

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He did his cursive and copywork before we left, then did some worksheets in the car and then talked up a storm to me about everything from various Amazonian animals to the Lord of the Rings to Harry Potter during our walk through the trees and amidst the rocks.

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I couldn’t get a good photo that could convey the size of the “bridge.” It was big, though. And an interesting cave.

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The “Indian Face”

Earlier this week, he was very pleased, because a grocery store clerk greeted his presence at my side in the early afternoon with a cheerful, “Are you homeschooled? rather than the usual lame, “Skipping school today, eh?”

She even asked what cover school we used.

You add that to the ER doctor’s story about his own son whom they homeschooled, and it was an affirming week, homeschool-wise.

— 6 —

Where we went to Mass on Sunday…a gorgeous church with amazing music. Chant, good hymnody, superbly done but not showy, absolutely in support of authentic worship.  The priest, in his late 60’s or early 70’s, was of the generation that had been formed to preside as if the congregation’s experience of God depended on their cheerfulness.  He gazed out us, grinning, during the entire Mass. A good chunk of the homily was about he, himself and him.  As I said, this is the way these guys were trained. They were taught that (clears throat, assumes mellifluous tones) the assembly’s experience of the Risen Lord’s presence among them begins with their experience of a hospitable and affirming environment, which of course begins with the Presider.

As I said, I’m sure this is what he was taught, and the man has helped more people in their times of need over the past month than I will my whole life.  But still.  Stop smiling at me, stop welcoming me, stop looking at me and just pray, please.

(The problem, however is that when a priest – usually one of the younger ones – affects a more solemn demeanor, they are taken to task by other parishioners who wonder why Father can’t be more personable and tell more jokes. They can’t win, of course.)

— 7 —

And some dogs like to ride on boats.

"amy welborn"

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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— 1 —

The most surprising cooking success of the week was the arancine.  I had never even made risotto before, but this turned our spectacularly and wasn’t even hard.

(No photos because honestly, I didn’t have time to take pictures of my food. Did you?)

The risotto takes time, yes (about 25 minutes of constant stirring/adding stock/stirring) but as I said, wasn’t a huge technical challenge.  I cooked the risotto on Tuesday, formed the arancini balls on Wednesday morning, refrigerated them, then fried them up right before dinner.  (Filled with a little bit of red sauce, some pancetta and relatively fresh mozzarella.)  They were just about perfect.

Arancine is just about my favorite thing to eat in Italy, and it may or may not be a good thing that I learned how to make them.

— 2 —

The drunken pork loin turned out well, too.  The recipe isn’t online, but it’s Marcella Hazan’s. 

— 3 —

I also made Michael Chiarello’s Caponata.  I had made it before, but this time the amount of vegetables seemed quite out of whack with the amount of sauce.  I observed this before I cooked the vegetables, so ended up putting only half of them in the pot, and it seemed just right.  Maybe I had a bigger eggplant?  Don’t know.

— 4 —

No, I’m not Italian, but it’s my favorite cuisine, so if you came to my house for Christmas, you were stuck with it.

— 5 —

Dessert?  Crostata with homemade ice cream.

— 6 —

Christmas Mass?  Christmas Eve at 10 PM at Casa Maria.  My adult son who lives in Atlanta discovered the hard way that his assumption that, “Huh…a 4pm Christmas Eve Mass? Who’s going to go to that?” was dead wrong as he wandered around the campus of the Cathedral looking for one of the three Masses going on that wasn’t standing room fifteen minutes before it started.  We didn’t have that problem, even in the sisters’ small chapel. It was full, but not packed.  Bishop Foley celebrated, the music was the usual simple, gorgeous reverence, and I didn’t have to stay up until 2 am.  

— 7 —

Looking for a daily devotional for 2014?  Try this!

"amy welborn"

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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— 1 —

I have the unbelievable good fortune of having, for once, a well-timed writing assignment.  That is, I’m penning an Advent devotional aid….during Advent.  Yes, it’s for 2014, but still.  Anyone who’s engaged in writing these kinds of things can tell you that the work more usually involves writing about Good Friday on Christmas Eve and Advent on Pentecost.

So..no excuses on this one!

— 2 —

Saw the Google Maps car this week, parked at the library branch a block from my house:

google maps car

Also, I’m thrilled to discover that with the leaves down, I can see downtown Birmingham from my house.   A nice view. Better than the photograph, of course.

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— 3 —

A spectacularly successful science demonstration this week - construct your own light bulb from batteries, wires, alligator clips, a toilet paper roll and a mechanical pencil lead.  It worked great – and led to lots of discussion and research on a variety of subjects: circuits, batteries, metals, the history of the light bulb…and so on.

"amy welborn"

— 4 —

Also successful was the science center’s homeschool class squid dissection. As per usual, I had the student teach the rest of us what he learned the next day, and it was clear he’d been engaged.  One of my Facebook friends did a cow’s 011eye dissection with her kids a few months back.  We did that in fifth grade, and it was really one of the more memorable educational experiences of my childhood.   Maybe we’ll give that a shot, too!

My dad was pre-med for a few months, and used to tell the story of having his cat on which to practice dissection.   Like, in the dorm shower.  He’d haul it out and study.

We’re not doing that.

(By the way, if you want to be a part of the digital expression of my homeschool hopes and dreams (read: fantasies) follow me on Pinterest, where, between the hours of midnight and 1 AM, I can often be found pinning my fabulous finds and plans into the ether…which is where they stay most of the time…predictably….

— 5 —

Huntsville Tuesdays are over!  FLL competition happened...and while it was fun and all, the team didn’t do well enough to make it to state.  Live and learn.

"first lego league"

I’d considered doing some Hunstville Thursdays in January (classes at the Space Center)  – but you know what? Nah.   We’re good.  January is pretty busy, what with basketball and all.

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Fun while it lasted

— 6 —

Art class! From the 9-year old, who is not happy with this – his efforts from his third art class – because it falls short "amy welborn"of perfection, but I’m impressed.  (It’s ink, with the emphasis in the exercise being to keep focused on the subject – a white pitcher and a white teapot –  not the paper. ) (It also got cropped in the scanning, and I’m too lazy to do it again right now)  He came back with a story told by his teacher of an artist who had his students study the objects they would be drawing, but then run up a flight of stairs before they could begin.

— 7 —

Bambinelli! Sunday! 

….come see me in Charleston.…watch Ann on Telecare!

Come back next week for information on our giveaway!

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

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